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Month in review
Reviews:
The Bourne Ultimatum by Robert Ludlum
Castle in the Air by Diana Wynne Jones
Cathedral Cats by Richard Surman
Civil Wars by David Moats
A Constellation of Cats edited by Denise Little
Day of Reckoning by Jack Higgins
A Dirty Job by Christopher Moore
Doctor Who: The Myth Makers by Donald Cotton
Fast Food Nation by Eric Schlosser
The Haunted Planet by D.J. Arneson
The Last Girls by Lee Smith
The Locket by Richard Paul Evans
The Man in the High Castle by Philip K. Dick
Martian Time-Slip by Philip K. Dick
Scooby-Doo and the Haunted Doghouse by Horace J Elias
A Swiftly Tilting Planet by Madelene L'Engle
Whispers by Dean Koontz
Wild Crimes by Dana Stabenow
A Year by the Sea by Joan Anderson

Miscellaneous:
Almost Ready for Harriet
Blankets Back on the Bed
A Busy Month of Guests
A Crib for Harriet
An Early Birthday Party
Getting Ready for Harriet
Good News for Sean's School
Inspired by...
No More Non-Stress Tests
One Last Ultrasound
That Darned Sock
Urban Settings

Previous month

Rating System

5 stars: Completely enjoyable or compelling
4 stars: Good but flawed
3 stars: Average
2 stars: OK
1 star: Did not finish

Reading Challenges

My Kind of Mystery Reading Challenge 2017 February - January 2017-8


Comments for The Bourne Ultimatum

The Bourne UltimatumThe Bourne Ultimatum: 08/04/06

I was looking forward to reading the final book in the Jason Bourne trilogy but after having suffered through it, I wish I had stopped after The Bourne Supremacy. The book fails in every way that the first two books succeed. The quick pace here is unnecessary and silly; Bourne is out of character; the political arena has changed too much to make the plot possible.

The original book and the one that followed were written at the height of the cold war. They take place in a time were the superpowers were suspicious and paranoid of each other. Espionage was big business for all of the big countries and many of the small ones. It was a time when communication was more difficult due to the lack of cell phones and the modern day internet. Yes; the precursors of both technologies existed but they were not being put to use in the ways that they are now. It was easier for spies to hide and countries to cover their tracks with misinformation and subterfuge.

Here is my BookCrossing review:

The Bourne Ultimatum takes place more than a decade later from the The Bourne Identity. This length of time between events makes the story unbelievable. After successfully being in hiding for so long and with Bourne clearly not active, there is no reason for the Jackal to resurface. Nor is there any reason for Bourne to go into a blind panic and race around the world drawing attention to himself and his family.

By the time of the third book, the cold war was ending. Germany was reunifying, the USSR was on the brink of collapse and mobile communication was becoming more ubiquitous with early cell phones. This environment is not one where Jason Bourne or Carlos could function using the tricks they had perfected after Vietnam. First of all, they'd be too old for chasing after each other. Second, the nations that had backed them were under new leadership and different foreign policy. What had been political maneuvering was now a silly personal cat and mouse game that is out of character for both major players!



Steps: 5000