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Month in review
Reviews:
The Bourne Ultimatum by Robert Ludlum
Castle in the Air by Diana Wynne Jones
Cathedral Cats by Richard Surman
Civil Wars by David Moats
A Constellation of Cats edited by Denise Little
Day of Reckoning by Jack Higgins
A Dirty Job by Christopher Moore
Doctor Who: The Myth Makers by Donald Cotton
Fast Food Nation by Eric Schlosser
The Haunted Planet by D.J. Arneson
The Last Girls by Lee Smith
The Locket by Richard Paul Evans
The Man in the High Castle by Philip K. Dick
Martian Time-Slip by Philip K. Dick
Scooby-Doo and the Haunted Doghouse by Horace J Elias
A Swiftly Tilting Planet by Madelene L'Engle
Whispers by Dean Koontz
Wild Crimes by Dana Stabenow
A Year by the Sea by Joan Anderson

Miscellaneous:
Almost Ready for Harriet
Blankets Back on the Bed
A Busy Month of Guests
A Crib for Harriet
An Early Birthday Party
Getting Ready for Harriet
Good News for Sean's School
Inspired by...
No More Non-Stress Tests
One Last Ultrasound
That Darned Sock
Urban Settings

Previous month

Rating System

5 stars: Completely enjoyable or compelling
4 stars: Good but flawed
3 stars: Average
2 stars: OK
1 star: Did not finish

Reading Challenges

My Kind of Mystery Reading Challenge 2017 February - January 2017-8


Comments for The Last Girls

The Last GirlsThe Last Girls: 08/25/06

I love the cover art, the title and the concept of the book. I just wish I had actually enjoyed reading The Last Girls. I kept waiting for the story to get started but it seemed bogged down incoherent flashbacks. The only progression the book managed was the river boat's slow trip down the Mississippi to New Orleans.

There's nothing wrong with a book made up of flashbacks. Many writers have done it successfully: Nabokov's Lolita and Knowles's A Separate Peace are both good examples. Or for a more contemporary example, Fforde's Eyre Affair uses extensive flashbacks to illustrate the present day world, explaining how it came to be, thus enriching Thursday Next's story. Lee's story should do the same thing but her many flash backs never cover the adventure that brought the women together as friends. Instead her many flashbacks further divide up the characters keeping them separated into different boxes and chapters. It isn't until the very last chapter that she even attempts to explain why they have all decided to reunite for the river cruise!

Here is my BookCrossing review:

After the death of a mutual friend, a group of women take one last journey together down the Mississippi to relieve a previous adventure they had shared and of course all the memories they had built together in their youth. It sounds like a story with great potential but it just isn't carried off. Throughout the book the present and past stories compete for page space so that neither one comes off in any coherent fashion. There is no room given for character growth and the protagonist is such a pushover that she never does anything to drive the plot except to reluctantly agree to do what everyone else tells her to do!



Steps: 3500