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Month in review

Reviews:
Alexander and the Wind-Up Mouse by Leo Lionni
Animal Attraction by Jamie Ponti
The Amityville Horror by Jay Anson
Atlantis Gate by Greg Donegan
Best-Loved Art From American Museums by Patricia Failing
Captains Courageous by Rudyard Kipling
Click, Clack Moo: Cows That Type by Doreen Cronin
Counterfeit Gentleman by Clarence Budington Kelland
Evidence of Love in a Case of Abandonment by M. Rickert
Falling Angel by Eugene Mirabelli
Fatal Vows by Joseph Hosey
Finders Seekers by Gayle Greeno
A Foreign Country by Wayne Wightman
Gentle Giant Octopus by Karen Wallace
It's About Your Friend by Phillip Scott
Leave by Robert Reed
The Liar by Stephen Fry
Love and Sand by Howard M. Layton
Mort by Terry Pratchett
The Only Known Jump Across Time by Eugene Mirabelli
Pinkalicious by Elizabeth and Victoria Kann
Planetesimal Dawn by Tim Sullivan
Requiem of the Author of Frankenstein by Molly Dwyer
Ring of Hell by Matthew Randazzo V
The Scarecrow's Boy by Michael Swanwick
Strike Anywhere by Dean Young
Tom's Midnight Garden by Philippa Pearce
Waiting for the Barbarians by J. M. Coetzee
Walking the Rainbow by Richard René Silvin
The World I Imagine by Debbie Jordan
Za-Za's Baby Brother by Lucy Cousins


Don Quixote:
Book 1
Book 2

Previous month

Rating System

5 stars: Completely enjoyable or compelling
4 stars: Good but flawed
3 stars: Average
2 stars: OK
1 star: Did not finish

Reading Challenges

My Kind of Mystery Reading Challenge 2017 February - January 2017-8



Comments for The Liar

The LiarThe Liar: 11/23/08

The name Stephen Fry for me brings to mind his roles in Blackadder and Wooster and Jeeves. Seeing is book, The Liar, available through bookcrossing piqued my interest.

The Liar follows the life and times of Adrian Healey from his time at boarding school through his early adulthood. The blurb on GoodReads, describes the book this way:

Adrian Healey is magnificently unprepared for the long littleness of life; unprepared too for the afternoon in Salzburg when he will witness the savage murder of a Hungarian violinist; unprepared to learn about the Mendax device; unprepared for more murders and wholly unprepared for the truth. Unprepared or not, Adrian is led through an adventure that takes in toast, Piccadilly rent-boys, Charles Dickens’s lost pornographic novel, an international espionage conspiracy, disgraceful scenes on the cricket field and a machine that compels its victims to tell the truth.

It sounds good, doesn't it? It sounds wacky, convoluted and full of potentially humorous mayhem. Unfortunately, it isn't.

There are moments of brilliance. The scenes in the boarding school and the last couple of chapters feel very real. The quotes and endorsements at the beginning of the book describe The Liar as an "autobiographical novel." I'm going to guess and say the school bits and the early acting career bits are autobiographical. The rest of the novel where Fry fleshes out Adrian as his own character with a life separate from his own lacks the same clarity.

Around the middle of the novel things fall apart. There doesn't seem to be any logic to explain how Adrian or anyone else in the novel gets from one plot point to another.

Even though I didn't enjoy The Liar as much as I had hoped I would, I would give Stephen Fry a second chance.

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