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Month in review

Reviews:
The Alarming Letters from Scottsdale by Warner Law
Brother by James Fredericks
Bubbles Betrothed by Sarah Strohmeyer
Bunny Modern by David Bowman
Cowboy Feng's Space Bar and Grille by Steven Brust
A Day With My Dad by Lance Waite
Dirt: An American Campaign by Mark LaFlamme
Divine Freefall by Beth Wiseman
50/50 by Dean Karnazes
Game Widow by Wendy Kays
Gateway by Frederik Pohl
How the Day Runs Down by John Langan
If You Give a Cat a Cupcake by Laura Numeroff and Felicia Bond
Jim the Boy by Tony Earley
Lorna Doone by R. D. Blackmore
Margarettown by Garbrielle Zevin
The Martian Chronicles by Ray Bradbury
Memphis: Objects, Furniture & Patterns by Richard Horn
The Minutemen's Witch by Charles Coleman Finlay
The New Writer's Handbook by Ted Kooser
One Crossed Out by Fanny Howe
The Once and Future Celt by Bill Watkins
Peter Hatches and Egg by Louise Bienvenu-Brialmont
Raindrop Plop! by
Ripley Under Water by Patricia Highsmith
A Skeptical Spirit by Albert E. Cowdrey
Smash Trash by Laura Driscoll
Sunsets and Shooting Stars by Rick Seidel
The Trumpet of the Swan by E. B. White
Uh-oh, Calico! by Karma Wilson
We Come Not to Praise Washington by Charles Coleman Finlay
Welcome to the Monkey House by Kurt Vonnegut Jr.
What Makes a Rainbow? by Betty Ann Schwartz
Zodiac by Neal Stephenson

Don Quixote:
Book 3
Book 4: Chapters 28-37
Book 4: End of Part 1

Miscellaneous:
Top Ten Lists

Previous month

Rating System

5 stars: Completely enjoyable or compelling
4 stars: Good but flawed
3 stars: Average
2 stars: OK
1 star: Did not finish

Reading Challenges

My Kind of Mystery Reading Challenge 2017 February - January 2017-8



Comments for Game Widow

Game WidowGame Widow: 12/17/08

A game widow (or widower) is someone who isn't a gamer but has a significant other who is. Game Widow by Wendy Kays is a handbook to help loved ones understand the lure of gaming.

I am not a game widow. I'm more of a lapsed gamer. I have found other hobbies to fill my time but I still enjoy watching my husband and children play. I'm more of a gaming mentor to my son than an active participant. Since I'm straddling the line between gamer and widow, I was curious about the book.

Kays starts of by describing the appeal of video games. She then looks at video games as an addiction and questions the danger of video game addiction. Her discussion of video games and addiction isn't scare mongering. While her research does point towards some extreme cases of addiction it also shows that the problem correlates with other forms of addiction. Video games by themselves aren't addicting but can be an addiction to someone prone to addiction. Kays also examines the video game industry inside and out. Her conclusion is that the industry is in need of restructuring due to it's own "still in the garage" mentality.

For the game widows and widowers out there, the two most important chapters are the last two. Chapter five, "What can I do?" lays out a strategy for discerning the degree of the problem (if there is one) and ways of coping. She also gives advice for times when it may be time to leave a relationship if the gaming addiction is accompanied by abuse. Of course not all gamers are spouses or lovers; they are also our children. Chapter five also includes parental advice. Chapter six has ways of learning about video game content and ratings without having to play them. While these sites are a starting point, I'd like to see more active participation from parents.

Game Widow is 118 pages long, with a few extra pages of end notes and bibliography. It's a quick, interesting and informative book. It was refreshing to read a recently published non-fiction book with properly documented citations. If you are a gamer or know a gamer, get yourself a copy of Game Widow.

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