Twitter Tumblr FlickrFacebookContact me
This Month Previous Articles Author Title Source Age Genre Series Format Inclusivity LGBTA Portfolio

Recent posts

Month in review

Reviews:
Agent to the Stars by John Scalzi
Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day by Judith Viorst
Babies on the Go by Linda Ashman
The Balloon Boy of San Francisco by Dorothy Kupcha Leland
Bandits of the Trace by Albert E. Cowdrey
The Book That Eats People by John Perry and Mark Fearing
Buffalo Before Breakfast (Magic Tree House #18) by Mary Pope Osborne
The Clue of the Tapping Heels by Carolyn Keene
Coraline by Neil Gaiman and P. Craig Russell
Crogan's Vengeance by Chris Schweizer
Do Not Open This Book! by Michaela Muntean
Dragon's Teeth by Alex Irvine
Keys to the City by Joel Kostman
Guy Time by Sarah Weeks
Immaculate Deception by Courtney J. Webb
Is There a Monster Over There? by Sally O Lee
Jeremy Draws a Monster by Peter McCarty
Letters to Rosy by C. Ellene Bartlett
The Man Who Lost His Head by Claire Huchet Bishop
Mummies in the Morning (Magic Tree House #3) by Mary Pope Osborne
My One Hundred Adventures by Polly Horvath
Out of Time by John Marsden
Promotion Denied by Joseph W. Hoffler
Scary Party by Sue Hendra
Scat by Carl Hiaasen
The Secret Science Alliance and the Copycat Crook by Eleanor Davis
Shadows on the Walls of the Cave by Kate Wilhelm
Shriek: An Afterword by Jeff VanderMeer
Swim to Me by Betsy Carter
Tigers at Twilight (Magic Tree House #19) by Mary Pope Osborne
The Travesties by Giselle Renarde
War, Women and the News by Catherine Gourley
The Wing on a Flea by Ed Emberley

Previous month

Rating System

5 stars: Completely enjoyable or compelling
4 stars: Good but flawed
3 stars: Average
2 stars: OK
1 star: Did not finish

Reading Challenges

My Kind of Mystery Reading Challenge 2017 February - January 2017-8



Comments for Letters to Rosy

Letters to Rosy cover art (Link goes to Powells)Letters to Rosy: 04/25/10

Rene Dubois and Roselee Payton were friends together in the 1950s and 1960s in a small town in America. Rene now lives in Germany and Roselee is still stateside. After years apart they pick up their friendship in the form of letter writing. Their letters bring to light a tragedy involving a widower and his missing daughter, Sasha.

I've had hit and miss results with reading epistolary novels. Letters to Rosy suffers from a flimsy premise and an even shakier execution. Worst of all is the characterization. Everyone is "so" this or that. It's a world populated with perfect people suffering through unmentionably awful tragedies. It's just too much to swallow.

The big secret that's revealed at the end is pretty obvious from the get-go because the words the so called modern characters are using are straight out of the 1950s.

I didn't manage to read the book in its entirety. I got about a third of the way through and skipped to the end. I received the book for review from the author. I have since released it through BookCrossing.

Other posts and reviews

| | |

Comments (0)

Permalink


Name:
Email (won't be posted):
Blog URL:
Comment: