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Month in review

Reviews
ABC I Like Me by Nancy Carlson
The Blight Family Singers by Kit Reed
The Blue Food Revolution by Tim Roux
Bone: The Great Cow Race by Jeff Smith
Bone: Eyes of the Storm by Jeff Smith
The Channel: Stories from L. A. by Susan Alcott Jardine
Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs by Judi Barrett
The Clue of the Broken Locket by Carolyn Keene
Building Manhattan by Laura Vila
The Dreamer: The Consequence of Nathan Hale by Lora Innes
Earthquake in the Early Morning (Magic Tree House #24) by Mary Pope Osborne
"The Economy of Vacuum" by Sarah Thomas
The Frog Prince Continued by Jon Scieszka
A Gift of Magic by Lois Duncan
Go Away Big Green Monster by Ed Emberley
Here Lies the Librarian by Richard Peck
I Needs Must Part, The Policeman Said by Richard Bowes
It Looked Like Spilt Milk by Charles G. Shaw
Jenny's Birthday Book by Esther Averill
The Light Fantastic by Terry Pratchett
The Little Band by James Sage
The Maze Runner by James Dashner
Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf
Oscar and the Cricket by Geoff Waring
Ottoline and the Yellow Cat by Chris Riddell
A Pale View of Hills by Kazuo Ishiguro
Stage Fright on a Summer Night (Magic Tree House #25) by Mary Pope Osborne
The Staircase by Ann Rinaldi
"Star-Crossed" by Tim Sullivan
Swine Not? by Jimmy Buffett
Take Me Out to the Ballgame by Gary Morgenstein
Theodosia and the Serpents of Chaos by R.L. LaFevers
The Titan's Curse Rick Riordan
Under the Lemon Trees by Bhira Backhaus
Yellowbelly and Plum Go to School by Nathan Hale

Rating System

5 stars: Completely enjoyable or compelling
4 stars: Good but flawed
3 stars: Average
2 stars: OK
1 star: Did not finish

Reading Challenges

My Kind of Mystery Reading Challenge 2017 February - January 2017-8



Comments for The Channel: Stories From L.A.

The Channel: Stories From L.A.: 07/20/10

 cover art (Link goes to Powells)Some cities evoke the tropes of certain genres. Old Los Angeles, in the days of the pueblo is action adventure (thanks mostly to Zorro) and twentieth century Los Angeles brings to mind hard boiled detective novels. Since the mid 1990s Los Angeles has been recast as a site of paranormal activity. There are a few earlier exceptions: some episodes of The Twilight Zone and Amazing Stories were set in Los Angeles, but it was really with Angel, Constantine and similar films and shows that the city became a paranormal haven.

The Channel by Susan Alcott Jardine is a ten story collection that combines the hardboiled style of writing with the paranormal themes, some reminiscent of The Twilight Zone and some more modern. The stories take place in different decades eras from recent history to a possible near future.

As a lover of short stories especially those in the science fiction, fantasy and horror genres, I found the book a quick and enjoyable read. I would like to read more stories by Susan Alcott Jardine.

In closing, the stories remind me very favorably of two Connie Willis novellas with a Los Angeles connection: D.A. and An Inside Job (review coming).

I received the book for review from the author.

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Comment #1: Thursday, July, 22, 2010 at 04:36:54

Susan Alcott Jardine

Dear Sarah Sammis,

Thank you for the wonderful review of my book THE CHANNEL: Stories From L.A.

I'm happy that you enjoyed it.

Best,
Susan Alcott Jardine



Comment #2: Saturday, July 24, 2010 at 20:02:43

Pussreboots

Thank you for the offer to review your book.