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Month in review

Reviews
Altered Realities by Alfred Bester
Angus and the Ducks
by Marjorie Flack
Batman: Year One by Frank Miller and David Mazzucchelli
Battlestar Galactica by Jeffrey A. Carver
Bhangra Babes by Narinder Dhami
The Big Rock Candy Mountain by Wallace Stegner
Bone: Ghost Circles by Jeff Smith
Bone: Treasure Hunters by Jeff Smith
Coast to Coast by Catherine Donzel
Crazy Hair by Neil Gaiman
The Devil's Arthmetic by Jane Yolen
The Dyodyne Experiment by James Doulgeris and V. Michael Santoro
The Emergence of Maps in Libraries by Walter William Ristow
Finding Marco by Kenneth C. Cancellara
The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Stieg Larsson
The Klondike Cat by Julie Lawson
Lavinia by Ursula K. Le Guin
The Little Rascals by Leonard Maltin
The Little Stranger by Sarah Waters
Monsoon Summer by Mitali Perkins
More Flanimals by Ricky Gervais
Mr McGratt and the Ornery Cat by Marilyn Helmer
My Guy by Sarah Weeks
Pass It Down by Leonard S. Marcus
Pure by Terra Elan McVoy
The Quest for Merlin's Map (The Jumper Chronicles) by W. C. Peever
Pure by Terra Elan McVoy
Room on the Broom by Julia Donaldson
Somewhere Off the Coast of Maine by Ann Hood
Texas Tomboy by Lois Lenski
Thief of Shadows by Fred Chappell
Wildfire by Sarah Micklem

Misc Thoughts:
In Search of Manning Coles


Rating System

5 stars: Completely enjoyable or compelling
4 stars: Good but flawed
3 stars: Average
2 stars: OK
1 star: Did not finish

Reading Challenges

My Kind of Mystery Reading Challenge 2017 February - January 2017-8



Comments for The Little Stranger

The Little Stranger: 10/11/10

 cover art (Link goes to Powells)I read The Little Stranger by Sarah Waters for the #TuesBooktalk book club on Twitter. It's the third of her books I've read, the other two being Affinity and Tipping the Velvet.

The Little Stranger returns to the paranormal of Affinity. It's set in 1940s, at a decaying manor haunted both by bad memories and a restless spirit. Dr. Faraday is called to the home when one of the servant girls feels poorly. Her story of strange happenings at the home begins the doctor's somewhat skeptical investigation of the possible haunting.

The book is Gothic horror rich in tension, emotions (guilt, regret and sadness) and ambiguity. It reminds me favorably of Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier and The Thirteenth Tale by Dianne Setterfield.

The book also shares a kinship with Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh when looking at the interaction of memory and physical spaces. Dr. Faraday has a history with the manor, having visited as a child. He recounts a time when he pried on of the decorations off the woodwork. Looking back at the decline of the family and their home, he feels his act of juvenile vandalism may have been the start of it all. For me, Faraday's misguided guilt was the reason behind his unhealthy and unhelpful obsession with the haunting.

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