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Month in review

Reviews
Anonymity by John Mullan
Baby Proof by Emily Giffin
A Barnstormer in Oz by Philip José Farmer
Bastard Tongues by Derek Bickerton
The Egg and I by Betty MacDonald
Foiled by Jane Yolen
Fort Clay, Louisiana: A Tragical History by Albert E. Cowdrey
The Frog Comrade by Benjamin Rosenbaum
Fundaments of Geographic Information Systems by Michael DeMers
Gallop by Rufus Butler Seder
Here Are My Hands by Bill Martin Jr.
Indigo Blue by Cathy Cassidy
Information Seeking
in Electronic Environments
by Gary Marchionini
The Lace Reader by Brunonia Barry
Looking for Lost Bird by Yvette Melanson
Lucifer Rising by Barbara Fifield
Northward to the Moon by Polly Horvath
On the Bluffs by Steven Schindler
The Osiris Alliance by Jack Ford
Otto's Orange Day by Jay Lynch
Patricia von Pleasantsquirrel by James Proimos
Peekaboo Baby by Rachel Isadora
Pinkalicious: Tickled Pink by Victoria Kann
The Portable MLIS edited by Ken Haycock and Brooke Sheldon
Remotest Mansions of the Blood by Alex Irvine
A Short History of Rudeness by Mark Caldwell
Silence by Dale Bailey
Ten Tiny Babies by Karen Katz
Textual Poachers by Henry Jenkins
Theodosia and the Staff of Osiris by R. L. LaFevers
A Touch of Dead by Charlaine Harris

Previous Month

Rating System

5 stars: Completely enjoyable or compelling
4 stars: Good but flawed
3 stars: Average
2 stars: OK
1 star: Did not finish

Reading Challenges

My Kind of Mystery Reading Challenge 2017 February - January 2017-8



The Egg and I: 01/23/11

cover art

Although I can read fast, I don't tear through every book I'm reading. Take for instance, The Egg and I by Betty MacDonald. I read it slowly, only about ten pages a week for ten months.

I read a review of The Egg and I at the start of 2010, I think on The Pioneer Woman blog, but I'm not sure. Shortly after adding it to my wishlist I spotted a copy at the Friends of the Library sale. Bonus! (Yes, I really think like this when finding books.)

So anyway, the book is a memoir and was made into a movie. Chances are I've seen the movie but I don't remember seeing it. The memoir is about life on a run down chicken ranch in Chimacum, Washington. There's the stove that works only when it wants to, the house that needs constant repair. And so on and so forth.

The book's divided into seasons and each one goes into lengthy detail about how the seasons affect the work on house, the work in the garden, the attitudes of the neighbors and the author's basic attitude towards life.

While I enjoyed the book, reading it at about a pace of two pages a day, I can't say it's perfect, or even close. The author is annoying and whines throughout about one thing or other. She takes out her frustrations on everyone and everything but never bothers to admit that she made the mistake of agreeing to move to that run down farm in the first place.

Comments (6)


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Comment #1: Monday, January, 24, 2011 at 07:21:02

Jennifer (An Abundance of Books)

I never knew this was a book. I've seen the movie a few times, and the narrator isn't whiny so much as she's unrealistic.



Comment #2: Friday, January 28, 2011 at 23:18:27

Pussreboots

One of these days I'll see if I can rent the movie. I think I saw it when I was a kid but the details have completely slipped my mind.



Comment #3: Monday, January, 24, 2011 at 13:39:26

Jeane

I liked this book a lot. But I think it was partly because the setting reminded me of where I grew up. I did wonder a bit why she moved to the remote farm when she didn't really have any experience raising chickens or anything. Never saw the movie, but I bet it's funny.



Comment #4: Friday, January 28, 2011 at 23:24:33

Pussreboots

I know people who have done similar things but not to the same extremes.



Comment #5: Wednesday, February, 2, 2011 at 03:47:47

Kathy Anderson

Betty MacDonald's The Egg and I is one of the most successful books ever written. Betty MacDonald's sister Alison Bard Burnett shares very funny and interesting details of Betty MacDonald's life in her interview with author Wolfgang Hampel. Betty had a very hard life at the chicken farm.



Comment #6: Saturday, February 5, 2011 at 23:08:34

Pussreboots

Thank you for information. Do you have any links you'd like to cite?