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Ann Can Fly by Fred Phleger
The Birthday Ball by Lois Lowry
The Blues Go Birding Across America by Carol L. Malnor and Sandy F. Fuller
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The Egyptian Jukebox by Nick Bantock
Flanimals Pop-up by Ricky Gervais
The Function of Ornament by Michael Kubo
The Illusions of Tranquility by Brendan DuBois
In Mike We Trust by P.E. Ryan
The Iron Man by Ted Hughes
The Last Olympian by Rick Riordan
Love that Dog by Sharon Creech
The Most Wonderful Egg in the World by Helme Heine
My Cat, the Silliest Cat in the World by Gilles Bachelet
The Mysterious Benedict Society by Trenton Lee Stewart
On a Scary Scary Night by Walter Wick
Owls by Gail Gibbons
Owl Lake by Keizaburo Tejima
Paula Bunyan by Phyllis Root
Proust and the Squid by Maryanne Wolf
Pump Six and Other Stories by Paolo Bacigalupi
Sky Burial by Xinran
Smile by Raina Telgemeier
Too Many Pumpkins by Linda White
Tirissa and the Necklace of Nulidor by Willow
Three Leaves of Aloe by Rand B. Lee
Treehorn's Treasure by Florence Parry Heide
What Do You Love? by Jonathan London
Wheel of the Moon by Sandra Forrester
Where is that Cat? by Carol Greene

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Rating System

5 stars: Completely enjoyable or compelling
4 stars: Good but flawed
3 stars: Average
2 stars: OK
1 star: Did not finish

Reading Challenges

My Kind of Mystery Reading Challenge 2017 February - January 2017-8



Treehorn's Treasure: 04/11/11

cover art

Treehorn's Treasure by Florence Parry Heide is the second in the Treehorn trilogy. In this one, the tree in the backyard briefly grows paper money and Treehorn is able to use it to buy the comics collection he has been wanting.

This book works with the same practical magic logic as The Shrinking of Treehorn. Something Treehorn puts in the tree makes the tree grow the paper money. When he removes it, the tree stops.

Like Bedtime for Mommy by Amy Krause Rosenthal (review coming), the Treehorn books work on role reversal. He, though a child, acts as the responsible one while his parents are self absorbed and childish. Treehorn's parents, though present, ignore their son's need for attention. Nor do they listen to him when he mentions what he likes or wants.

What makes the story tick though, are Edward Gorey's wonderful pen and ink illustrations. It would be a very different series with a lighter or comedic touch to the pictures.

Four stars

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