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Reviews
Alfred Hitchcock and the Making of Psycho by Stephen Rebello
And a Bottle of Rum by Wayne Curtis
Anne of Green Gables by LM Montgomery
Big Red Lollipop by Rukhsana Khan
Calvin Coconut: Trouble Magnet by Graham Salisbury
A Change in Altitude by Anita Shreve
City of Spies by Susan Kim & Laurence Klavan
Compost Stew by Mary McKenna Siddals
The Daddy Book by Todd Parr
The End of the Alphabet by CS Richardson
Filipinos in Alaska by Thelma Buchholdt
Fullmetal Alchemist 05 by Hiromu Arakawa
Grave Sight by Charlaine Harris
Junonia by Kevin Henkes
Knuffle Bunny Free by Mo Willems
Labyrinth by Kate Mosse
The Lake by Banana Yoshimoto
Looking Like Me by Walter Dean Myers
My Dog Toby by Andrea Zimmerman and David Clemesha
Olivia Goes to Venice by Ian Falconer
Once Wicked, Always Dead by T. Marie Benchley
Our Lady of Immaculate Deception by Nancy Martin
The Sevenfold Spell by Tia Nevitt
Something to Do by David Lucas
Stella, Princess of the Sky by Marie-Louise Gay
The Tale of the Namelss Chameleon by Brenda Carre
A Toast to Tomorrow by Manning Coles
Tuey's Course by James Ross
Tyranny by Lesley Fairfield
Vampire Theory by Lily Caracci
Waiting for Wings by Lois Ehlert

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Rating System

5 stars: Completely enjoyable or compelling
4 stars: Good but flawed
3 stars: Average
2 stars: OK
1 star: Did not finish

Reading Challenges

My Kind of Mystery Reading Challenge 2017 February - January 2017-8



Filipinos in Alaska: 1788-1958: 07/02/11

cover art

A year ago I began a concerted effort to read books off my wishlist. Being a list oriented person, I decided to start with the oldest wishes. Many of these early wishes go well beyond my memory as to why I had wanted to read them.

One of those mystery books is a bound book of mimeographed text and photocopied photographs called Filipinos in Alaska: 1788-1958 by Thelma Buchhold. Now I do have an interest in Alaska history and I did once write a paper on Filipino culture in college but I can't for the life of me remember either hearing about this book or wanting to read it.

That's not to say I didn't get anything out of reading it. It was actually fascinating in its own way. The earliest chapters track any potential Filipino shipmate who might have made a port of call in Alaska. Later it tracks known Filipino families as they settled. The final chapters read more like a phone book of Filipinos who were living in Alaska in the 1950s.

As a census (small c as it's not done by the Census) of a specific minority in Alaska it's an interesting and focused document. What's missing though is a secondary analysis of the data. What do the numbers mean? Why did they settle where they did? How did they contribute to Alaska culture? What is their legacy.

Three stars.

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Comment #1: Sunday, July, 3, 2011 at 11:49:38

aloi

it's pretty amazing how far filipinos have scattered across the world! i now for a fact that there is a filipino community in yellowknife!



Comment #2: Sunday, July 3, 2011 at 22:44:14

Pussreboots

It was an interesting book but I wanted something a little more.