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Alfred Hitchcock and the Making of Psycho by Stephen Rebello
And a Bottle of Rum by Wayne Curtis
Anne of Green Gables by LM Montgomery
Big Red Lollipop by Rukhsana Khan
Calvin Coconut: Trouble Magnet by Graham Salisbury
A Change in Altitude by Anita Shreve
City of Spies by Susan Kim & Laurence Klavan
Compost Stew by Mary McKenna Siddals
The Daddy Book by Todd Parr
The End of the Alphabet by CS Richardson
Filipinos in Alaska by Thelma Buchholdt
Fullmetal Alchemist 05 by Hiromu Arakawa
Grave Sight by Charlaine Harris
Junonia by Kevin Henkes
Knuffle Bunny Free by Mo Willems
Labyrinth by Kate Mosse
The Lake by Banana Yoshimoto
Looking Like Me by Walter Dean Myers
My Dog Toby by Andrea Zimmerman and David Clemesha
Olivia Goes to Venice by Ian Falconer
Once Wicked, Always Dead by T. Marie Benchley
Our Lady of Immaculate Deception by Nancy Martin
The Sevenfold Spell by Tia Nevitt
Something to Do by David Lucas
Stella, Princess of the Sky by Marie-Louise Gay
The Tale of the Namelss Chameleon by Brenda Carre
A Toast to Tomorrow by Manning Coles
Tuey's Course by James Ross
Tyranny by Lesley Fairfield
Vampire Theory by Lily Caracci
Waiting for Wings by Lois Ehlert

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5 stars: Completely enjoyable or compelling
4 stars: Good but flawed
3 stars: Average
2 stars: OK
1 star: Did not finish

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Comments for Stella, Princess of the Sky

Stella, Princess of the Sky: 07/26/11

 cover art (Link goes to Powells)Stella, Princess of the Sky by Marie-Louise Gay is one of the Stella and Sam series of books. I included on my list of astronomy themed books for children ages 5 to 8.

The book begins with a conversation between Stella and Sam about the sunset and how the sky changes over the course of the day. It prompts the children to stay out that night, camping under the stars. They observe the sky above and the animals around them.

The illustrations capture the changing colors of the night: pastel oranges and pinks at sunset, deepening purples to blues as it gets later and brilliant whites for the stars. The question and answer approach of Sam and Stella's conversation can inspire children and parents to make their own observations about what they see and hear at night time.

It's more than just a book out basic backyard astronomy. There's also good talking points about nocturnal animals and other night time things. This book would do well in any number of themes that teachers or parents might have in mind.

Four stars.

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Comment #1: Saturday, July, 30, 2011 at 14:55:49

Sarah

I love the Stella and Sam books, as well as the new tv show. They are very imaginative and highlight how much fun it can be to get out and be active.



Comment #2: Sunday, July 31, 2011 at 23:14:45

Pussreboots

I've only read the one book. I didn't even know about the TV show. I hardly watch any TV any more.



Comment #3: Sunday, July, 31, 2011 at 10:31:34

Wanda

Love the Stella and Sam books! I bought a set of four mini books last year for my niece who was named for my grandmother, Stella. :)



Comment #4: Sunday, July 31, 2011 at 23:16:03

Pussreboots

I've only read this one book but I will read others if I find them at the library.