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Month in review

Reviews
Amped by Daniel H. Wilson
Amulet 5: Prince of the Elves by Kazu Kibuishi
Corduroy by Don Freeman
The Damned Highway by Nick Mamatas and Brian Keene
Dot by Patricia Intriago
Drift House by Dale Peck
Ed Emberley's Drawing Book of Weirdos by Ed Emberley
Emily the Strange: Dark Times by Rob Reger
Emily the Strange: Stranger and Stranger by Rob Reger
Flirting with Forever by Gwyn Cready
Flood and Fire by Emily Diamand
Four Valentines in a Rainstorm by Felicia Bond
Fullmetal Alchemist 18 by Hiromu Arakawa
The Girl Who Fell Beneath Fairyland and Led the Revels There by Catherynne M. Valente
Grip of the Shadow Plague by Brandon Mull
How to Survive a Garden Gnome Attack by Chuck Sambuchino
Imagine a Day by Sarah L. Thomson and Rob Gonsalves
Inside Out by Maria V. Snyder
Liberty Falling by Nevada Barr
Llama Llama Home with Mama by Anna Dewdney
Mansfield Park (audio) by Jane Austen
One Year in Coal Harbor by Polly Horvath
The Phantom Limb by William Sleator and Ann Monticone
Round Like a Ball by Lisa Campbell Ernst
Sam Johnson and the Blue Ribbon Quilt by Lisa Campbell Ernst
There Are Cats in This Book by Viviane Schwarz
The Wing on a Flea (original) by Ed Emberley
Worldshaker by Richard Harland
Yesterday by CK Kelly Martin
Zen Ties by Jon J. Muth

Previous month

Rating System

5 stars: Completely enjoyable or compelling
4 stars: Good but flawed
3 stars: Average
2 stars: OK
1 star: Did not finish

Reading Challenges

My Kind of Mystery Reading Challenge 2017 February - January 2017-8



Comments for Dot

Dot: 09/18/12

 cover art (Link goes to Powells)Dot by Patricia Intriago is an opposites book that uses pairs of dots to illustrate concepts. Like many other reviewers, the cover art made think of Press Here by Hervé Tullet (review coming) but Dot ended up having much more re-readability.

Many of the dots are black circles against the start white background. Sometimes the dot isn't a dot or it's distorted. For example, in the "hard dot, soft dot" spread, a finger presses down on the dots. One dot remains circular while the other one appears to give under the pressure. When color is needed, it's used but sparingly.

Early on, red and green are used for "stop dot, go dot." The simplicity of the book reminds me of the earliest pages of One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish by Dr. Seuss. It had a similar appeal as Seuss's fish book for my daughter. Before returning it to the library she read it at least a dozen times.

Five stars

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