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Month in review

Reviews
Amped by Daniel H. Wilson
Amulet 5: Prince of the Elves by Kazu Kibuishi
Corduroy by Don Freeman
The Damned Highway by Nick Mamatas and Brian Keene
Dot by Patricia Intriago
Drift House by Dale Peck
Ed Emberley's Drawing Book of Weirdos by Ed Emberley
Emily the Strange: Dark Times by Rob Reger
Emily the Strange: Stranger and Stranger by Rob Reger
Flirting with Forever by Gwyn Cready
Flood and Fire by Emily Diamand
Four Valentines in a Rainstorm by Felicia Bond
Fullmetal Alchemist 18 by Hiromu Arakawa
The Girl Who Fell Beneath Fairyland and Led the Revels There by Catherynne M. Valente
Grip of the Shadow Plague by Brandon Mull
How to Survive a Garden Gnome Attack by Chuck Sambuchino
Imagine a Day by Sarah L. Thomson and Rob Gonsalves
Inside Out by Maria V. Snyder
Liberty Falling by Nevada Barr
Llama Llama Home with Mama by Anna Dewdney
Mansfield Park (audio) by Jane Austen
One Year in Coal Harbor by Polly Horvath
The Phantom Limb by William Sleator and Ann Monticone
Round Like a Ball by Lisa Campbell Ernst
Sam Johnson and the Blue Ribbon Quilt by Lisa Campbell Ernst
There Are Cats in This Book by Viviane Schwarz
The Wing on a Flea (original) by Ed Emberley
Worldshaker by Richard Harland
Yesterday by CK Kelly Martin
Zen Ties by Jon J. Muth

Previous month

Rating System

5 stars: Completely enjoyable or compelling
4 stars: Good but flawed
3 stars: Average
2 stars: OK
1 star: Did not finish

Reading Challenges

My Kind of Mystery Reading Challenge 2017 February - January 2017-8



Comments for Inside Out

Inside Out: 09/24/12

 cover art (Snyderk goes to Powells)Inside Out by Maria V Snyder is dystopian social commentary in a similar vein to 1984 by George Orwell, Fritz Lang's Metropolis and the recently published Worldshaker by Richard Harland. They are all closed, heavily controlled societies where everyone has their place for better or worse.

What sets Inside Out apart from the other closed society dystopians I've mentioned is that it's told from the point of view of the lowest members of society. So often these stories begin in a privileged position, with a character who can't believe things are as bad as the rumors say. He then gets a chance to set himself apart from his peers by actually going amongst the lowest caste and after living their experience first hand, going home to make things better for them.

Trella, though, and her peers, are the lowest members of society. Her perspective gives an appropriately inside-out view of oppression. Furthermore, by making her female, there's another layer of scrutiny on privilege, specifically, male privilege.

The protagonist, Trella is a scrub. She cleans the things that keep the world functioning. The pipes connect all the levels together and are the one thing uniting the Uppers and Lowers.

Trella, though, gets a chance to rebel and learn the truth behind their society. She is brought together with a rebellious Upper who reminds me of Freder, the male lead from Metropolis. A tenuous romance does spark between them but it's secondary to their desire to protect the Broken Man and uncover long buried secrets.

Five stars

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Comment #1: Tuesday, October 02, 2012 at 00:53:25

MarthaE

Good perspective mentioned in your review. I'm glad you liked this. Will you get the second (Outside In) to read too? I see you mentioned two others I have to check out. Thanks - more books. :-0



Comment #2: Thursday, October 04, 2012 at 20:16:12

Pussreboots

I plan to post a review of Outside In later in the year. Which other books on my list caught your fancy?