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Month in review

Reviews
Accidental Time Traveller by Janis Mackay
The Big Wander by Will Hobbs
The Black Circle by Patrick Carman
Boy Meets Boy by David Levithan
Canadian Cinema Since the 1980s: At the Heart of the World by David L. Pike
The Canary Trainer by Nicholas Meyer
Changeless by Gail Carriger
Escape from Bridezilla by Jacqueline deMontravel
The First Eagle by Tony Hillerman
Fletcher and Zenobia by Edward Gorey
Garment of Shadows by Laurie R. King
The Great Desert Race by Betty Baker
Great House by Nicole Krauss
Her Permanent Record by Jimmy Gownley
Lion in the Valley by Elizabeth Peters
The Main Corpse by Diane Mott Davidson
Midnight in Austenland by Shannon Hale
My Invisible Boyfriend by Susie Day
Odd Duck by Cecil Castellucci
Ottoline At Sea by Chris Riddell
Packing for Mars by Mary Roach
The Rules by Stacey Kade
The Secret of the Stone Frog by David Nytra
Skywalkers: Mohawk Ironworkers Build the City by David Weitzman
The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats
Someday by Charlotte Zolotow
Speaking from Among the Bones by Alan Bradley
The Twelve Bots of Christmas by Nathan Hale
Who's Seen the Scissors by Fernando Krahn
Your Hate Mail Will Be Graded by John Scalzi

Previous month

Rating System

5 stars: Completely enjoyable or compelling
4 stars: Good but flawed
3 stars: Average
2 stars: OK
1 star: Did not finish

Reading Challenges

My Kind of Mystery Reading Challenge 2017 February - January 2017-8




Comments for The Big Wander

The Big Wander: 06/19/13

The Big Wander by Will Hobbs is a tween fiction about a fourteen year old boy doing his best to find his missing uncle. The Big Wander by Will Hobbs is a tween fiction about a fourteen year old boy doing his best to find his missing uncle. When the book opens, Clay and his older brother, Mike, leave Seattle for Arizona and New Mexico, in search for Uncle Clay.

Mike and Clya are on their own during summer break while their mother is in South America, doing charity work. They have about $200 and an old truck to last them through the summer. Their only clue is a call from a place that sounds like "Restaurant Hay."

The book has three distinct parts (with a small coda at the end): the brothers traveling together, Clay by himself, and Clay with a Navajo family. It's not until Clay is on his own that the book becomes something special.

Clay, relying on a burro, a stray dog, and a later a pinto horse, gets into some of the most remote areas of the borderlands between Arizona, New Mexico and Utah (much but not all, within the Navajo Nation). His travels take him roughly from Monument Valley to present day Lake Powell — in the weeks before the valleys were flooded to create the lake.

Five stars

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