Twitter Tumblr FlickrFacebookContact me
This Month Previous Articles Author Title Source Age Genre Series Format Inclusivity LGBTA Portfolio

Recent posts


Month in review

Reviews
50 Underwear Questions by Tanya Lloyd Kyi
Adventures in Cartooning: Characters in Action by James Sturm
Angus, Thongs and Full-Frontal Snogging by Louise Rennison
The Awakening by Kelley Armstrong
Bachelor Brothers' Bed & Breakfast by Bill Richardson
Blameless by Gail Carriger
The Cat Who Had 60 Whiskers by Lilian Jackson Braun
Chopping Spree by Diane Mott Davidson
The Crows of Pearblossom by Aldous Huxley
Daffodil by Noël Kingsbury
The Dark Wind by Tony Hillerman
Double Shot by Diane Mott Davidson
Flowers for Mrs. Harris by Paul Gallico
Gulp by Mary Roach
How They Croaked by Georgia Bragg
Ideas and Opinions by Albert Einstein
Into the Gauntlet by Margaret Peterson Haddix
Mr. Flux by Kyo Maclear
Rooftop Cat by Frank Le Gall
Scholastic Dictionary of Spelling by Marvin Terban
Should I Share My Ice Cream? by Mo Willems
Song for Papa Crow by Marit Menzin
Soulless: The Manga, Vol. 1 by Gail Carriger
This Perfect Day by Ira Levin
Super Boys by Brad Ricca
Trash Can Days: A Middle School Saga by Teddy Steinkellner
The Voyage of the Space Beagle by A.E. van Vogt
Waterless Mountain by Laura Adams Armer
Way Station by Clifford D. Simak
Where Do The Animals Go When It Rains? by Janet S. Crown

Previous month

Rating System

5 stars: Completely enjoyable or compelling
4 stars: Good but flawed
3 stars: Average
2 stars: OK
1 star: Did not finish

Reading Challenges

My Kind of Mystery Reading Challenge 2017 February - January 2017-8




Where Do The Animals Go When It Rains?: 09/30/13

cover art

Where Do The Animals Go When It Rains? by Janet S Crown is a short (24 pages) picture book about animals, their environment and rain.

As the description explains, this book was born out of a nightly routine of the author inventing animal stories with her children. The titular question is one I've heard plenty of times from my two. I'm sure I asked my own family the same question as a child.

The simple style to illustrations (think Saturday morning cartoon) and the one sentence rhyming explanation per animal makes this a book best suited for the youngest of readers — those just learning to snuggle up to a goodnight read before bed.

As there aren't a wide range of animals included, parents have the room to augment the book with whatever animals live nearby. Here we would include wild turkeys, quail, rattle snakes, and so forth.

Three stars

Comments (0)


Name:
Email (won't be posted):
Blog URL:
Comment: