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Month in review

Reviews
Avatar: The Last Airbender: The Search, Part 2 by Gene Luen Yang
Bad Island by Doug TenNapel
Bigger Than a Bread Box by Laurel Snyder
Blue Sky by Audrey Wood
The Bumper Book of Nature by Stephen Moss
Code Talker by Chester Nez and Judith Schiess Avila
Country Road ABC by Arthur Geisert
A Dance for Emilia by Peter S. Beagle
Domestic Manners of the Americans by Frances Trollope Emancipation Proclamation: Lincoln and the Dawn of Liberty by Tonya Bolden
Flight by Sherman Alexie
Fool Moon by Jim Butcher
The Garden of Abdul Gasazi by Chris Van Allsburg
How I Stole Johnny Depp's Alien Girlfriend by Gary Ghislain
The Journey of Tunuri and the Blue Deer by James Endredy
Leo Geo and His Miraculous Journey Through the Center of the Earth by Jon Chad
The Lost Treasure of Tuckernuck by Emily Fairlie
Maggie and the Pirate by Ezra Jack Keats
Natural History by Justina Robson
On Stranger Tides by Tim Powers
The One and Only Ivan by Katherine Applegate
The Port Chicago 50 by Steve Sheinkin
Rust: Secrets of the Cell by Royden Lepp
The Sacramento, River of Gold by Julian Dana
Tatty Ratty by Helen Cooper
Tiger Trek by Ted Lewin
A Very Fuddles Christmas by Frans Vischer
A Wounded Name by Dot Hutchinson

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Rating System

5 stars: Completely enjoyable or compelling
4 stars: Good but flawed
3 stars: Average
2 stars: OK
1 star: Did not finish

Reading Challenges

My Kind of Mystery Reading Challenge 2017 February - January 2017-8



Comments for The Port Chicago 50

The Port Chicago 50: 02/28/14

 cover art

The Port Chicago 50 by Steve Sheinkin is a young adult nonfiction history of the Port Chicago explosion and its aftermath.

Port Chicago, California, near Martinez along the southern coast of Suisun Bay, was a navy base and town that served as the shipping point for live munitions during WWII. Black men who wanted to serve their country were stationed at places like this, doing jobs their white counterparts were too scared to perform.

On July 17, 1944 a massive explosion killed 300 people and leveled a large portion of naval yard. Among the survivors, 244 men, decided working conditions were too unsafe and they refused to return to work. Fifty of those men were singled out and charged with mutiny.

The Port Chicago 50 covers an important piece of domestic WWII, and early Civil Rights history. It's a piece that has been overlooked and ignored in history books and shouldn't be.

Five stars

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