Twitter Tumblr FlickrFacebookContact me
This Month Previous Articles Author Title Source Age Genre Series Format Inclusivity LGBTA Portfolio

Recent posts


Month in review

Reviews
Adrift on St. John by Rebecca M. Hale
Alan Mendelsohn, the Boy From Mars by Daniel Pinkwater
Bad Girls by Jane Yolen and Heidi E. Y. Stemple
Bluffton by Matt Phelan
Brave Harriet: The First Woman to Fly the English Channel by Marissa Moss
Brother, I'm Dying by Edwidge Danticat
Bullying Under Attack by John Meyer
Dead City by James Ponti
The Dead of Night by Peter Lerangis
Dear Enemy by Jean Webster
Dear Teen Me by E. Kristin Anderson
Dust Girl by Sarah Zettel
Flora and Ulysses: The Illuminated Adventures by Kate DiCamillo
The Girl Who Soared Over Fairyland and Cut the Moon in Two by Catherynne M. Valente
Goggles! by Ezra Jack Keats
Good Night California by Adam Gamble
How to Moon a Cat by Rebecca M. Hale
How to Tail a Cat by Rebecca M. Hale
Junie B., First Grader, Shipwrecked by Barbara Park
Looks Like Daylight by Deborah Ellis
On the Road to Mr. Mineo's by Barbara O'Connor
A Question of Magic by E.D. Baker
The Sea Serpent and Me by Dashka Slater
Snuff by Terry Pratchett
Spider Woman's Daughter by Anne Hillerman
The Spooky Tail of Prewitt Peacock by Bill Peet
To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
Tommysaurus Rex by Doug TenNapel
Voltron Volume 1: Shelter from the Storm by Brian Smith
Wandering Son: Volume 1 by Shimura Takako Zombies Calling by Faith Erin Hicks

Previous month

Rating System

5 stars: Completely enjoyable or compelling
4 stars: Good but flawed
3 stars: Average
2 stars: OK
1 star: Did not finish

Reading Challenges

My Kind of Mystery Reading Challenge 2017 February - January 2017-8



Comments for Snuff

Snuff: 05/21/14

cover art

I have come to the conclusion that my favorite way to enjoy a Terry Pratchett book is through a combination of listening to an audio (preferably read by Stephen Briggs) and re-reading notable passages and chapters in print. What this means is I'm starting to amass duplicate copies of the Discworld novels.

Snuff by Terry Pratchett is the 39th Discworld novel. Commander Vimes is out of his element, taken on holiday to his wife's family estate. He's away from his bacon sandwiches, his Watch, and the streets of Ankh-Morpork. As an unwelcome outsider, and one who doesn't want to play by the rules ascribed to that of a lord, Vimes brings out the worst in people. He's also nearly framed for a murder.

Crime though is Vimes's thing. He has the law in his blood. The brutal killing of a goblin brings to the surface years of subjugation of, and violence against, goblins by humans (and other species of the disc). Vimes through his belief in the law swallows his prejudices long enough to get to know the goblins who live under the hills of this country township.

What surfaces through the investigation and growing friendship is a better understanding of goblin culture and the price they've paid for the expansion of human progress across the disc. While Jingo began the criticism of the spread of the British empire (through a political and military clash between Ankh-Morpork and Klatch), Snuff looks at the civilian cost of conquest indigenous people wiped out through war and disease, other peoples transplanted through slavery, institutionalized poverty, loss of native culture and the imposing of a new culture and morality.

Snuff is one of most heartbreaking volume of the Discworld stories (I Shall Wear Midnight in close second). What started off as a series of humorous episodes full of puns and ridiculous situations has evolved into a mature (albeit entertaining) discussion of politics, racism, sexism, war, injustice, poverty, class and caste systems, religion, and on and on.

Five stars

Comments (0)


Name:
Email (won't be posted):
Blog URL:
Comment: