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Month in review

Reviews
Avatar: The Last Airbender: The Rift, Part 1 by Gene Luen Yang
Brewster's Millions by George Barr McCutcheon
The Case of the Cryptic Crinoline by Nancy Springer
The Dead and the Gone by Susan Beth Pfeffer
Demonglass by Rachel Hawkins
Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell
Fullmetal Alchemist 24 by Hiromu Arakawa
Ghouls Gone Wild by Victoria Laurie
Golden Girl by Sarah Zettel
Grave Peril by Jim Butcher
Hogfather by Terry Pratchett
Hunting Badger by Tony Hillerman
Hyperbole and a Half by Allie Brosh
Imprisoned by Martin W. Sandler
Inferno by Dan Brown
Jane Vows Vengeance by Michael Thomas Ford
The Lies That Bind by Kate Carlisle
The Long War by Terry Pratchett and Stephen Baxter
The Magic Paintbrush by Laurence Yep
The Magician's Bird by Emily Fairlie
The Mark of Athena by Rick Riordan
1985 by Anthony Burgess
Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen
Ostrich and Lark by Marilyn Nelson
The Radleys by Matt Haig
Raising Steam by Terry Pratchett
Shatterproof by Roland Smith
1607: A New Look at Jamestown by Karen E. Lange
Trash by Andy Mulligan
$20 Per Gallon by Christopher Steiner

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Rating System

5 stars: Completely enjoyable or compelling
4 stars: Good but flawed
3 stars: Average
2 stars: OK
1 star: Did not finish

Reading Challenges

My Kind of Mystery Reading Challenge 2017 February - January 2017-8



Comments for Inferno

Inferno: 06/22/14

cover artInferno by Dan Brown is the fourth Robert Langdon book. I've read and enjoyed each of them because they are silly and capery, much like the Cats and Curious series I love. This one takes place in Italy and Turkey.

Robert awakes in hospital to a splitting headache and a nightmarish vision of war and death. Worse yet, he's in Italy and he doesn't know how or when he got there! Before he can get his bearings, the chase is on. He and his surgeon are running for their lives.

Normally I cringe at amnesia plots but the Robert Langdon books are inherently silly. Here the clues are derived from Dante's Divine Comedy (and mostly the Inferno part). Dante apparently put a lot of himself and his life into his works and now a master criminal (mad man) is taking advantage of that fact.

This mad man has taken Dante's work to heart and has hidden clues to the whereabouts of a new plague within the landmarks and artworks that date back to Dante's time.

The introduction of a plague (or a formula) combined with European history and a male and female team on the run makes for an adult caper very much in tone with the original 39 Clues series. The ending, though, set in Turkey, felt like a jarring crossover with Clive Cussler's Crescent Dawn.

Four stars

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