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Month in review

Reviews
Avatar: The Last Airbender: The Rift, Part 1 by Gene Luen Yang
Brewster's Millions by George Barr McCutcheon
The Case of the Cryptic Crinoline by Nancy Springer
The Dead and the Gone by Susan Beth Pfeffer
Demonglass by Rachel Hawkins
Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell
Fullmetal Alchemist 24 by Hiromu Arakawa
Ghouls Gone Wild by Victoria Laurie
Golden Girl by Sarah Zettel
Grave Peril by Jim Butcher
Hogfather by Terry Pratchett
Hunting Badger by Tony Hillerman
Hyperbole and a Half by Allie Brosh
Imprisoned by Martin W. Sandler
Inferno by Dan Brown
Jane Vows Vengeance by Michael Thomas Ford
The Lies That Bind by Kate Carlisle
The Long War by Terry Pratchett and Stephen Baxter
The Magic Paintbrush by Laurence Yep
The Magician's Bird by Emily Fairlie
The Mark of Athena by Rick Riordan
1985 by Anthony Burgess
Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen
Ostrich and Lark by Marilyn Nelson
The Radleys by Matt Haig
Raising Steam by Terry Pratchett
Shatterproof by Roland Smith
1607: A New Look at Jamestown by Karen E. Lange
Trash by Andy Mulligan
$20 Per Gallon by Christopher Steiner

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Rating System

5 stars: Completely enjoyable or compelling
4 stars: Good but flawed
3 stars: Average
2 stars: OK
1 star: Did not finish

Reading Challenges

My Kind of Mystery Reading Challenge 2017 February - January 2017-8



Comments for Northanger Abbey

Northanger Abbey: 06/28/14

cover art

For me, the best way to understand (or at least be introduced) to the themes to Jane Austen's novels is through the vast landscape of inspired novels and adaptations and re-imaginings. Most recent ones seem obsessively focused on Pride and Prejudice. But there are a few here and there for the other novels, if one looks hard enough.

Shannon Hale's Midnight in Austenland for instance is a great send up of Northanger Abbey. Like Hale's protagonist, young Catherine Morland is seeing mystery where there might not be any. She is also having trouble mustering the confidence to think for herself, especially around loud, opinionated, know-it-all men.

Catherine on a trip to Bath ends up the plaything for the other families present. She goes along good-naturedly as she is expected to but she'd rather have time to explore or to read.

I enjoyed seeing (or rather hearing, as I read this as an audio) that inspired Midnight in Austenland. I also laughed at the pokes at popular culture and snobbery.

Four stars

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