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Month in review

Reviews
Better Nate Than Ever by Tim Federle
Blair's Attic by Joseph C. Lincoln
Can I Play Too? by Mo Willems
The Case of the Gypsy Good-bye by Nancy Springer
The Complete Guide to Digital Photography (2nd edition) by Michael Freeman
Confessions of a Shopaholic by Sophie Kinsella
Death Masks by Jim Butcher
Divergent by Veronica Roth
Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell
Ghostbusters, Volume 6: Trains, Brains, and Ghostly Remains by Erik Burnham
Gracias / Thanks by Pat Mora
The Great EB: the Story of the Encyclopaedia Britannica by Herman Kogan
How to be a Baby ... By Me, the Big Sister by Sally Lloyd-Jones
Ink by Amanda Sun
Jalna by Mazo de la Roche
Japanese Aesthetics and Anime: The Influence of Tradition by Dani Cavallaro
Julia, Child by Kyo Maclear
Let's Say Hi to Friends Who Fly! by Mo Willems The Long Mars by Terry Pratchett and Stephen Baxter
The Loud Book! by Deborah Underwood
The Mad Potter: George E. Ohr, Eccentric Genius by Jan Greenberg
Scarlett Fever by Maureen Johnson
Show Way by Jacqueline Woodson
Sisters by Raina Telgemeier
Sketchtravel by Gerald Guerlais
Socksquatch by Frank W. Dormer
Unfed by Kirsty McKay
University by Bentley Little
Voltron Force Volume 4: Rise of the Beast King by Brian Smith
xxxHolic Volume 16 by CLAMP
xxxHolic Volume 17 by CLAMP

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Rating System

5 stars: Completely enjoyable or compelling
4 stars: Good but flawed
3 stars: Average
2 stars: OK
1 star: Did not finish

Reading Challenges

My Kind of Mystery Reading Challenge 2017 February - January 2017-8



Comments for Ink

Ink: 10/24/14

cover art

Ink by Amanda Sun is the start of a new young adult series set in Japan. Katie Greene has been forced by the death of her mother to move to Shizouka, Japan to live with her aunt. She'd rather be in Canada with her grandparents, instead, she's stuck with cram school, a language she can barely speak or read. It's a major case of culture shock.

Things go awry for Katie when she forgets to change her shoes before heading home. Embarrassed she has to rush back into the locker room where she over hears an argument. Not sure what to do, she ends up in the middle of it all, and sees the boy's drawings move.

Thus Ink transforms from a YA romance into something more akin to YA urban fantasy with a horror undertone. Katie, rather than running from the things she has seen, is drawn to them. She seeks out the boy, Tomohiro, desperate to know his story.

Although Ink is Canadian fiction set in Japan, it reads like a Japanese light novel. It's full of the tropes that populate anime and manga. It was an entertaining, quick read — perfect for my BART commute to and from work. The sequel is Rain and it's on my to be read list.

Five stars

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