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Reviews
Amazing Grace by Mary Hoffman
Big Hairy Drama by Aaron Reynolds
Chicken with Plums by Marjane Satrapi
Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage by Haruki Murakami
Creepy Carrots! by Aaron Reynolds
Culture is Our Business by Marshall McLuhan
Drood by Dan Simmons
Emily and the Strangers Volume 1 by Rob Reger
The Evolution of Calpurnia Tate by Jacqueline Kelly
Forget-Her-Nots by Amy Brecount White
I Remember Beirut by Zeina Abirached
The Isobel Journal by Isobel Harrop
Language and Art in the Navajo Universe by Gary Witherspoon
Leven Thumps and the Gateway to Foo by Obert Skye
Mad Scientist by Jennifer L. Holm
A Midsummer Tights Dream by Louise Rennison
Mr. Toppit by Charles Elton
Niño Wrestles the World by Yuyi Morales
Once Upon a Curse by E.D. Baker
101 Things I Hate About Your House by James Swan
The People Inside by Ray Fawkes
Shackleton: Antarctic Odyssey by Nick Bertozzi
Strange Fruit, Volume 1 by Joel Christian Gill
Unicorns? Get Real! by Kathryn Lasky
Unthinkable by Nancy Werlin
Whiteoaks of Jalna by Mazo de la Roche
Zita the Spacegirl by Ben Hatke
Zombelina by Kristyn Crow

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Rating System

5 stars: Completely enjoyable or compelling
4 stars: Good but flawed
3 stars: Average
2 stars: OK
1 star: Did not finish

Reading Challenges

My Kind of Mystery Reading Challenge 2017 February - January 2017-8



Comments for Creepy Carrots!

Creepy Carrots!: 02/02/15

cover art

Creepy Carrots! by Aaron Reynolds is a mashup between Peter Rabbit and your typical zombie story. Japser Rabbit loves the carrots that grow in the Crackenhopper fields. But there's a rumor that they are evil, monster carrots.

Like Nancy Raines Day's On a Windy Day, there's a monstrous version of the creeping carrots and then there's a reveal of which ordinary objects went to create the illusion of the carrots.

The monster pages are done in a comic book, horror style heavy on the orange and black — perfect for a Halloween read. The reveal pages are contrasted with their wider range of colors and almost pastel hues.

But as every horror story should, there's a twist at the end. Maybe, just maybe, there's some truth to Jasper's over-active imagination.

Five stars

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