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Month in review

Reviews
Andy McBean and the War of the Worlds by Dale Kutzera
Bad Kitty School Daze by Nick Bruel
Boy Writers: Reclaiming Their Voices by Ralph Fletcher
Buzz! by Ananth Panagariya
David Hockney: A Bigger Picture by Tim Barringer
The Death of Bernadette Lefthand by Ronald B. Querry
Ghouls, Ghouls, Ghouls by Victoria Laurie
Grandpa Green by Lane Smith
Hard Truth by Nevada Barr
How To by Julie Morstad
J. C. Leyendecker by Michael Schau
Listening for Lucca by Suzanne LaFleur
Moby Duck by Donovan Hohn
Moonhead and the Music Machine by Andrew Rae
My Many Colored Days by Dr. Seuss
The Necropolis Railway by Andrew Martin
A Night in the Lonesome October by Roger Zelazny
Paul Is Undead: The British Zombie Invasion by Alan Goldsher
Phoebe and Her Unicorn: A Heavenly Nostrils Chronicle by Dana Simpson
Sammy the Seal by Syd Hoff
Satan's Prep by Gabe Guarente
Satellites in Outer Space by Isaac Asimov
The Seer of Shadows by Avi
Sneakers, the Seaside Cat by Margaret Wise Brown
Stars by Mary Lyn Ray
The Tail of Emily Windsnap by Liz Kessler
A Touch of Gold by Joyce Lavene and Jim Lavene
Tut: The Story of My Immortal Life by P.J. Hoover
When You Are Alone/It Keeps You Capone by Myra Cohn Livingston
Zombie in Love by Kelly DiPucchio

Miscellaneous
No students! or My First Bookstore
On deja vu or why I keep a list of what I read
Replacing ARCs with Research
Why I'm no longer accepting review copies

Previous month

Rating System

5 stars: Completely enjoyable or compelling
4 stars: Good but flawed
3 stars: Average
2 stars: OK
1 star: Did not finish

Reading Challenges

My Kind of Mystery Reading Challenge 2017 February - January 2017-8



The Necropolis Railway: 04/18/15

cover artThe Necropolis Railway by Andrew Martin is the first of a mind boggling eight long series of train themed mysteries set in the turn of the last century's England.

Jim Stringer gets his wish to work on the steam trains. Instead of getting the line he wants, he's assigned the Necropolis Railway — a line that ran from London to a massive cemetery.

While the book's description claims to be a thrilling mystery steeped in railway lore — I never really got to the mystery. Although I like trains, my interest doesn't come close to Stringer's obsessive fasciation.

Then there's Stringer himself. As the new kid on the railway, he's not popular. There's obviously something hinky going on that he's not privy to. Rather the usual bullying or hazing that this sort of story usually requires, Stringer prattles on about how good he is and how good a railway man he'll be someday. He becomes such an unbelievable and unlikable Marty Stu that I had to stop the book.

 

 

One star

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