Twitter Tumblr FlickrFacebookContact me
Now Previous Articles Road Essays Author Title Source Age Genre Series Format Inclusivity LGBTA Portfolio

Recent posts


Month in review

Reviews
Ammie, Come Home by Barbara Michaels
Are You My Mother? by Alison Bechdel
The Boy with the Cuckoo-Clock Heart by Mathias Malzieu
Calling Dr. Laura: A Graphic Memoir by Nicole J. Georges
Charlie and Lola: My Best, Best Friend by Lauren Child and Carol Noble
Day of Doom by David Baldacci
The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore by William Joyce
Finch's Fortune by Mazo de la Roche
Five, Six, Seven, Nate! by Tim Federle
The Ghost Prison by Joseph Delaney
Golden Domes and Silver Lanterns by Hena Khan
Grandma's Gift by Eric Velasquez
Greenglass House by Kate Milford
Happy Families by Tanita S. Davis
Here She Is, Ms Teeny-Wonderful by Martyn Godfrey
Hey! Who Stole the Toilet? by Nancy E. Krulik
How to Be a Cat by Nikki McClure
I Was Told There'd Be Cake by Sloane Crosley
Julia's House for Lost Creatures by Ben Hatke
Line 135 by Germano Zullo
Mr. and Mrs. Bunny — Detectives Extraordinaire! by Polly Horvath
Night Soldiers by Alan Furst
Regards to the Man in the Moon by Ezra Jack Keats
Scribble by Deborah Freedman
Ten Rules You Absolutely Must Not Break if You Want to Survive the School Bus by John Grandits
Then Came You by Jennifer Weiner
To This Day: For the Bullied and Beautiful by Shane Koyczan
Whistle for Willie by Ezra Jack Keats
Your Food Is Fooling You by David A. Kessler
Zak's Lunch by Margie Palatini
Zen Attitude by Sujata Massey

Miscellaneous
Not Every Book Gets a Review
One star ratings are short hand for DNF

Previous month

Rating System

5 stars: Completely enjoyable or compelling
4 stars: Good but flawed
3 stars: Average
2 stars: OK
1 star: Did not finish

Reading Challenges

My Kind of Mystery Reading Challenge 2017 February - January 2017-8



The Ghost Prison: 05/30/15

cover art

The Ghost Prison by Joseph Delaney is a first person account of a night guard at a prison. Billy's job is to help feed a prisoner who is more monster than person, and to keep watch on the ghosts of prisoners who have died while serving their sentences.

This is a very short book and heavily illustrated. It's really more like a short story repurposed as a tween horror because the main character fits into the age group. As introduction to the horror short story genre, it's an acceptable stepping stone to the likes of Poe, Lovecraft, or du Maurier — if it were taken as part of a larger collection.

But as a standalone it lacks punch beyond what Scott M. Fisher's dark and moody illustrations bring. The surprise ending is anything but. It's drawn from the same sort of story telling of the summer campfire, lacking even the twists and turns of an R.L. Stine book.

Two stars

Comments (0)


Name:
Email (won't be posted):
Blog URL:
Comment: