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Month in review

Reviews
Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Sáenz
Aviary Wonders Inc. Spring Catalog and Instruction Manual by Kate Samworth
Blue Mountain by Martine Leavitt
Bob's Hungry Ghost by Geneviève Côté
The Cats of Tanglewood Forest by Charles de Lint
The Cute Girl Network by M.K. Reed
Dreaming Spies by Laurie R. King
Firmin: Adventures of a Metropolitan Lowlife by Sam Savage
Fleabrain Loves Franny by Joanne Rocklin
The Fog Diver by Joel Ross
Framed in Lace by Monica Ferris
Gabriel Finley and the Raven's Riddle by George Hagen
Ghost Hawk by Susan Cooper
How Much Is a Million? by David M. Schwartz
In the Night Kitchen by Maurice Sendak
Level Up by Gene Luen Yang
The Lost Boy by Greg Ruth
Monster High by Lisi Harrison
My Pet Book by Bob Staake
No by Claudia Rueda
Pigmalion by Glenda Leznoff
Science Fiction by Joe Ollmann
Seconds by Bryan Lee O'Malley
Sleep Like a Tiger by Mary Logue
Too Many Tamales by Gary Soto
Tsubasa: Reservoir Chronicle 10 by CLAMP
The Twins' Blanket by Hyewon Yum
Waluk by Emilo Ruiz
Where Are You, Blue Kangaroo by Emma Chichester Clark
Wire Mothers: Harry Harlow and the Science of Love by Jim Ottaviani
You and Me by Susan Verde

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Rating System

5 stars: Completely enjoyable or compelling
4 stars: Good but flawed
3 stars: Average
2 stars: OK
1 star: Did not finish

Reading Challenges

My Kind of Mystery Reading Challenge 2017 February - January 2017-8



The Cute Girl Network: 10/16/15

The Cute Girl Network by M.K. Reed:The relationship between Jane and Jack is a nice twist on the third law of library science: every book it's reader.

The Cute Girl Network by M.K. Reed is a graphic novel about the budding relationship between a skateboarder named Jane, a soup vender named Jack. Jack's ex-girlfriends, self dubbed "the cute girl network" decide to save Jane from her fate of unhappiness if she continues to date Jack.

The relationship between Jane and Jack is a nice twist on the third law of library science: every book it's reader. There's somebody out there for anyone. We learn about Jack's oddities through both the Cute Girl Network and through Jane's interactions with him.

Jack is forgetful, prone to doing bizarre things, likes weird things, etc. But Jane isn't a "typical" woman either (if such a thing exists). She likes skateboarding, cult films, gross out humor, etc. The Cute Girl Network sees Jane as one of their own only because Jane is a woman and because Jack is interested in her. Sure, that's two points of similarity, but it's not enough and throughout they just can't wrap their collective heads around that fact.

Skateboarding

The cute girl network reminds me a lot of a younger version of the "Bermuda Triangle of Gibbs" from N.C.I.S.. After Gibbs's first wife and daughter were murdered he went through a series of bad relationships and his exes are there in the background to criticize and warn off any future potential exes (and seem to be doing a pretty good job of it).

But what they deem unacceptable for being too weird or too disgusting, Jane sees as endearing or funny. For instance, he keeps his cellphone in his underwear because it falls out of his pockets or he doesn't have pockets. They can't get past the eew factor of it being underwear but Jane just laughs it off as one of his many memorable quirks.

Memorable quirks

The relationship between Jane and Jack also reminds me of the Harry Chapman song, "Shooting Star," though I don't think Jack is as broken as the man in the song. Jack is unusual and maybe not 100% normal but he's well meaning and functional. He is taking care of himself. He is paying his bills. He can hold down a job. Jack probably won't ever be a multi-figure executive but not everyone needs to be and not everyone wants or needs that in a companion!

Five stars

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