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Are You There God? It's Me, Margaret by Judy Blume
Autokind Vs. Mankind by Kenneth R. Schneider
Bat and Rat by Patrick Jennings
Blue Pills: A Positive Love Story by Frederik Peeters
Bohemians edited by Paul Buhle
By Book or By Crook by Eva Gates
Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins
Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl
Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator by Roald Dahl
Clean Sweep! Frank Zamboni's Ice Machine by Monica Kulling
Cupcake Cousins by Kate Hannigan
Desolation Angels by Jack Kerouac
Fight Club by Chuck Palahniuk
The Girl Who Raced Fairyland All the Way Home by Catherynne M. Valente
Good-Bye, Chunky Rice by Craig Thompson
Hamster Princess: Of Mice and Magic by Ursula Vernon
Hunters of Chaos by Crystal Velasquez
I See Kitty by Yasmine Surovec
Little Robot by Ben Hatke
Locke & Key, Volume 1: Welcome to Lovecraft by Joe Hill
The Long Utopia by Terry Pratchett and Stephen Baxter
My Little Pony: Micro-Series: #3: Rarity by Katie Cook
One Book in the Grave by Kate Carlisle
The Outside Circle: A Graphic Novel by Patti Laboucane-Benson
Sherlock Bones 1 by Yuma Ando
Summer Showers by Kate Hannigan
Three Bears in a Boat by David Soman
Trailer Park Fae by Lilith Saintcrow
Vested Interests: Cross-Dressing and Cultural Anxiety by Marjorie Garber
Wandering Son: Volume 2 by Shimura Takako

Miscellaneous
The road not taken

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Rating System

5 stars: Completely enjoyable or compelling
4 stars: Good but flawed
3 stars: Average
2 stars: OK
1 star: Did not finish

Reading Challenges

My Kind of Mystery Reading Challenge 2017 February - January 2017-8



One Book in the Grave: 04/21/16

One Book in the Grave by Kate Carlisle

One Book in the Grave by Kate Carlisle is the fifth in the Bibliophile Mystery series. Brooklyn is hired to rebind a copy of Beauty and the Beast only to realize on seeing it that it's stolen property. She surfacing of this book leads to murder and questions about a friend who died years ago.

I originally started reading this series for the book binding aspect. When the main character is allowed to focus on her job there's a lot of fascinating technical information woven into the stories. More and more though it seems that the emphasis is switching away from Brooklyn's skills as a binder and book restorer to her former life in a Sonoma hippy commune.

The problem is the hippy communes were short lived and pretty much over by my earliest childhood. I'm in my 40s. Brooklyn is otherwise written as if she's in her 30s but the technological and cultural mise-en-scene of this series is contemporary, meaning it's put in the second decade of the twenty-first century. If that is the case, Brooklyn should be somewhere between five to ten years older than I am.

Now there's the case of the bad guys in this book. Brooklyn seems to bring out the worst in her colleagues. I don't know if book bindery is really this cut throat a profession. Really, it seems like Brooklyn has her own personal Team Rocket chasing her down and it's getting tiresome.

Two stars

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