Twitter Tumblr FlickrFacebookContact me
This Month Previous Articles Author Title Source Age Genre Series Format Inclusivity LGBTA Portfolio

Recent posts


Month in review

Reviews
Across the Continent by The Lincoln Highway by Effie Price Gladding
The Acts of King Arthur and His Noble Knights by John Steinbeck
Arsène Lupin, Gentleman-Thief by Maurice Leblanc
Baby Driver: A Story About Myself by Jan Kerouac
Blackwork by Monica Ferris
Bone Gap by Laura Ruby
Buttons and Bones by Monica Ferris
Cocaine Blues by Kerry Greenwood
The Colossus of Roads: Myth and Symbol Along the American Highway by Karal Ann Marling
Delilah Dirk and the Turkish Lieutenant by Tony Cliff
Far from Fair by Elana K. Arnold
Footer Davis Probably Is Crazy by Susan Vaught
The Friendship Riddle by Megan Frazer Blakemore
The Inn Between by Marina Cohen
The Isle by Jordana Frankel Jem and The Holograms 1 by Kelly Thompson
Kissing in America by Margo Rabb
The Land of Forgotten Girls by Erin Entrada Kelly
The Missing Ink by Karen E. Olson
Monkey Beach by Eden Robinson
The Nameless City by Faith Erin Hicks
No Ghouls Allowed by Victoria Laurie
Painting with a Lens by Rod Deutschmann and Robin Deutschmann
Photography of Natural Things by Freeman Patterson
Splat and the Cool School Trip by Rob Scotton
Survival Strategies of the Almost Brave by Jen White
Twenty Yawns by Jane Smiley
Umbrella by Taro Yashima The Underwater Welder by Jeff Lemire
The Ward by Jordana Frankel
The Woman-Haters by Joseph C. Lincoln

Miscellaneous
My life as a teenage book addict, or, Sarah becomes a reader
Playing Pokémon Go as a parent
The terrible previews before Ghostbusters

Previous month

Rating System

5 stars: Completely enjoyable or compelling
4 stars: Good but flawed
3 stars: Average
2 stars: OK
1 star: Did not finish

Reading Challenges

My Kind of Mystery Reading Challenge 2017 February - January 2017-8



The Friendship Riddle: 07/17/16

The Friendship Riddle by Megan Frazer Blakemore

The Friendship Riddle by Megan Frazer Blakemore is the story of a long forgotten scavenger hunt rediscovered by accident. Ruth Mudd-O'Flaherty is pretty much a loner at school, one of only two kids with same sex parents. She has two mothers and her ex-best-friend, Charlotte, has two fathers.

Charlotte has broken off their friendship because she feels like it's been forced by circumstances. She feels like their parents have forced them together into a friendship and she wants to go out on her own and make different friends.

Ruth, though hurt, also agrees with Charlotte. So she tries to play it cool as a lone wolf at the school now. She can't completely cut herself off from Charlotte as she and her fathers live in an apartment over the library.

Anyway, it's in the middle of all these hurt feelings that Ruth finds a clue in an old book. It's the distraction she so desperately needs and it takes her on a journey through her small town and it's history.

Typically in these sorts of treasure hunts, the clues, even when long forgotten, end up being found in order and where they were originally left. Also, frustratingly, the hunt, though it goes all over the place, usually ends up right at the beginning. Here, though, none of that is true. A big part of this book is the figuring out of how many clues there are, what order they go in, what they mean as a whole, and ultimately who left them.

It was also nice to see Ruth and Charlotte patch up their friendship into something more genuine through their collaboration on the treasure hunt. Charlotte with her easy access to the library had also found a clue and was on her own way through the puzzle. Better yet, it was seeing the girls make a wider range of friends, all who were interested in solving this old puzzle.

Five stars

Comments (0)


Name:
Email (won't be posted):
Blog URL:
Comment: