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Bera the One-Headed Troll by Eric Orchard
Blackbird Fly by Erin Entrada Kelly
Blue Highways by William Least Heat-Moon
Borrowed Crime by Laurie Cass
Dark Days by James Ponti
Death at Victoria Dock by Kerry Greenwood
The Detective's Assistant by Kate Hannigan
Doctor Who: The Roots of Evil by Philip Reeve
The Flying Beaver Brothers and the Crazy Critter Race by Maxwell Eaton III
For Today I Am a Boy by Kim Fu
Fred and Ted's Road Trip by Peter Eastman
Free Fall by David Wiesner
The Geek Feminist Revolution by Kameron Hurley
Ghostbusters: Get Real by Erik Burnham
Gone Crazy in Alabama by Rita Williams-Garcia
Hip Hop Family Tree, Vol. 3: 1983-1984 by Ed Piskor
The Light Between Oceans by M.L. Stedman
Lowriders to the Center of the Earth by Cathy Camper
The Master of Jalna by Mazo de la Roche
Murder on the Ballarat Train by Kerry Greenwood
Nothing Up My Sleeve by Diana López
Pete the Cat and His Magic Sunglasses by Kimberly and James Dean
The Pharos Gate by Nick Bantock
Retribution Falls by Chris Wooding
The River by Alessandro Sanna
Six Kids and a Stuffed Cat by Gary Paulsen
The Sleepover by Jen Malone
Threadbare by Monica Ferris
To Catch a Cheat by Varian Johnson
Underground Airlines by Ben H. Winters

Miscellaneous
Diversity report for September 2016

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5 stars: Completely enjoyable or compelling
4 stars: Good but flawed
3 stars: Average
2 stars: OK
1 star: Did not finish

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My Kind of Mystery Reading Challenge 2017 February - January 2017-8



Hip Hop Family Tree, Vol. 3: 1983-1984: 09/06/16

Hip Hop Family Tree, Vol. 3: 1983-1984 by Ed Piskor

Hip Hop Family Tree, Vol. 3: 1983-1984 by Ed Piskor covers the bit of hip hop that I'm actually familiar with. It's 13 years into the new genre and it's exploded out of the Five Burroughs and onto radio, record stores, and now onto the powerhouse of cable in the mid 1980s: MTV.

In 1983-4, I was in 4th and 5th grade. I had a hand-me-down radio in my bedroom and that gave me the power to explore music on my own. Also by dint of my location in the house I had the best radio reception. Being able to turn a dial and listen to things that caught my attention without parental intervention was amazing and liberating.

One of the stations I discovered (on a school bus) was the Mighty 690, an AM station that at one time played a mixture of punk, hip hop, new wave, and stuff that's now called alternative. Mighty 690 became a talk and sports channel and the DJs moved over to FM to 91X. It was there that I heard many of the crossover artists mentioned in Piskor's earlier volumes, as well as one from this one: Run DMC.

Run DMC on MTV

Run DMC as Piskor notes had the distinction of being the first black rap video on MTV. Rapture by Blondie was the first. Though I grew up in a household without cable and rarely watched MTV when I was at my grandmother's, I did see Irwin Corey's introduction to Run DMC's Rock Box.

I may have been growing up in suburbia but even I could see how insulting and patronizing his attempt to explain the shocking sounds of rap to poor, easily shocked, mainstream Americans. What that intro really served as was a stalling tactic for parents to shut off the TV before that "awful inner city music" corrupted their children, as some of my friends' parents did.

My grandmother, though, would not tuck with such behavior. She was more of the, watch, read, listen to anything, just don't use it as an excuse to get into trouble. Maybe too it was her working class background, but she never seemed to mind whatever I decided to watch or listen to at her house. Usually she sat down to watch with me (including the Rock Box video, and later, The Wall).

This three volume graphic novel history of hip hop has been both entertaining and educational. I've found that I actually rather like hip hop.

Five stars

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