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Reviews
Bera the One-Headed Troll by Eric Orchard
Blackbird Fly by Erin Entrada Kelly
Blue Highways by William Least Heat-Moon
Borrowed Crime by Laurie Cass
Dark Days by James Ponti
Death at Victoria Dock by Kerry Greenwood
The Detective's Assistant by Kate Hannigan
Doctor Who: The Roots of Evil by Philip Reeve
The Flying Beaver Brothers and the Crazy Critter Race by Maxwell Eaton III
For Today I Am a Boy by Kim Fu
Fred and Ted's Road Trip by Peter Eastman
Free Fall by David Wiesner
The Geek Feminist Revolution by Kameron Hurley
Ghostbusters: Get Real by Erik Burnham
Gone Crazy in Alabama by Rita Williams-Garcia
Hip Hop Family Tree, Vol. 3: 1983-1984 by Ed Piskor
The Light Between Oceans by M.L. Stedman
Lowriders to the Center of the Earth by Cathy Camper
The Master of Jalna by Mazo de la Roche
Murder on the Ballarat Train by Kerry Greenwood
Nothing Up My Sleeve by Diana López
Pete the Cat and His Magic Sunglasses by Kimberly and James Dean
The Pharos Gate by Nick Bantock
Retribution Falls by Chris Wooding
The River by Alessandro Sanna
Six Kids and a Stuffed Cat by Gary Paulsen
The Sleepover by Jen Malone
Threadbare by Monica Ferris
To Catch a Cheat by Varian Johnson
Underground Airlines by Ben H. Winters

Miscellaneous
Diversity report for September 2016

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Rating System

5 stars: Completely enjoyable or compelling
4 stars: Good but flawed
3 stars: Average
2 stars: OK
1 star: Did not finish

Reading Challenges

My Kind of Mystery Reading Challenge 2017 February - January 2017-8



Pete the Cat and His Magic Sunglasses: 09/25/16

Pete the Cat and His Magic Sunglasses by Kimberly Dean

Pete the Cat and His Magic Sunglasses by Kimberly and James Dean is the first Pete the Cat book to be written by the illustrator, rather than musician Eric Litwin. Pete's having a tough day, nothing is going right. So a friend gives him a pair of magic sunglasses to cheer him up and he passes along the good deed to others in need.

The original Pete the Cat books have a strong, rather obvious message of rolling with whatever life throws at you. It's not that Pete is a heartless cat, rather he's just very self assured and happy. Seeing Pete on an off day already sets this book off on the wrong note, as it were.

In the first book, Pete the Cat, I Love my White Shoes, Pete's beautiful new shoes end up splashing through all sorts of things and turning all sorts of colors as he goes through his day. He doesn't need help to overcome the shock of potentially ruining his shoes. Instead he laughs it off with a "Goodness, No!" and carries on his merry way.

Here though Pete seems to have forgotten that mantra. All sorts of little annoyances (like the weather) are getting him down and he needs his rose tinted Ray Bans to perk up and then once cheered up, goes on to share them with other animals in similar distress. I see Pete as such a happy cat that he'd be the one making up the story of the sunglasses being magic to cheer up his friends.

It's a minor quibble, I realize, but it was something both my daughter and I picked up on while reading Pete the Cat and His Magic Sunglasses.

Three stars

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