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Month in review

Reviews
Absolutely Truly by Heather Vogel Frederick
And Then You Dye by Monica Ferris
Aunt Flossie's Hats (and Crab Cakes Later) by Elizabeth Fitzgerald Howard
Avenging the Owl by Melissa Hart
Bigmama's by Donald Crews
Cat With a Clue by Laurie Cass
Clarice Bean, Guess Who's Babysitting? by Lauren Child
Cloud and Wallfish by Anne Nesbet
Cy Whittaker's Place by Joseph C. Lincoln
Empty Places by Kathy Cannon Wiechman
The Firefly Code by Megan Frazer Blakemore
Full of Beans by Jennifer L. Holm
Ghost by Jason Reynolds
Ghosts by Raina Telgemeier
Honey by Sarah Weeks
It Ain't So Awful, Falafel by Firoozeh Dumas
Jeremy Fink and the Meaning of Life by Wendy Mass
Knit One, Kill Two by Maggie Sefton
The Last Monster by Ginger Garrett
Paper Wishes by Lois Sepahban
Pretty in Ink by Karen E. Olson
Radio Girls by Sarah-Jane Stratford
Save Me a Seat by Sarah Weeks and Gita Varadarajan
Sea Change by Frank Viva
The Sculptor by Scott McCloud
Slacker by Gordon Korman
Sophie Quire and the Last Storyguard by Jonathan Auxier
Sweet Venom by Tera Lynn Childs
This is San Francisco by Miroslav Sasek
Viva Frida by Yuyi Morales
Waiting for Augusta by Jessica Lawson

Miscellaneous
October Reading Summary

Previous month

Rating System

5 stars: Completely enjoyable or compelling
4 stars: Good but flawed
3 stars: Average
2 stars: OK
1 star: Did not finish

Reading Challenges

My Kind of Mystery Reading Challenge 2017 February - January 2017-8



And Then You Dye: 10/31/16

And Then You Dye by Monica Ferris

And Then You Dye by Monica Ferris is the sixteenth of the Needlecraft mysteries. Betsy hosts a class on dying yarn. What initially sounds like good natured ribbing between like minded attendees turns angry. Shortly after the class the teacher is found murdered in her home.

Many of the recent books have been set outside of Excelsior but this one is back to the series's roots, literally and figuratively. Much of the plot hinges on the sorts of materials the deceased was using for her dyes, including the accusation that she was steeling them from friends and neighbors.

The book also has one of the longest running red herrings I've seen in a mystery. Since I've managed to figure out other plots in this series fairly quickly I just went with the herring and took it as "obvious plot is obvious." Until it wasn't and that was a nice surprise.

Four stars

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