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December 2017

Rating System

5 stars: Completely enjoyable or compelling
4 stars: Good but flawed
3 stars: Average
2 stars: OK
1 star: Did not finish

Reading Challenges

My Kind of Mystery Reading Challenge 2017 February - January 2017-8



14 Hollow Road: 12/17/17

14 Hollow Road by Jenn Bishop

14 Hollow Road by Jenn Bishop is a middle grade fiction inspired by real events. Maddie has been looking forward to the sixth grade dance — the last big event at her school for the year. She has the perfect dress, the perfect hairstyle, and she's hoping to dance with her long time friend (and crush). But all of that goes wrong. He dances with someone else, the lights go off, and she returns home to find her home flattened by a freak tornado and her beloved dog missing.

The remainder of the book is the aftermath — the recovery from losing everything. Her parents and brother are fine but the dog is missing, presumed dead. They're now living next door, sharing the space with their neighbors, whose home was spared. She's sharing a room with her crush — the one who didn't dance with her! But mostly she's devastated by the disappearance of her dog.

The first few chapters — the ones that set up the remainder of the book — scared the bejeebers out of me. I'm a Californian and we don't usually have tornadoes here. The way though that the storm is lingering there with the storm mentioned on the radio as scenic background noise to how the lights go off and the generators don't fire up sets the stage for what's to come.

The missing dog plot also hit home. My state has gone through some horrendous wildfires and there have been dozens of stories of families fleeing without their pets. Though many pets have died there are also stories of pets being rescued in the cleanup operations afterwards, as well as owners' uncertainty and guilt for not being able to get them to safety.

Despite all the drama and loss, this book does have a happy, hopeful ending.

Four stars

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Mysteries reviewed in 2017: 12/16/17

Mysteries reviewed in 2017

Mysteries have always been a staple of my reading. I know my focus is primarily children's and YA, with the emphasis being on middle grade books, but the mysteries receive regular attention too. Mysteries are my go-to genre for escapist reading.

At the end of February, I was invited to join the My Kind of Mystery Challenge. Joining the challenge gave me the chance to focus my mystery reviewing into a regular, weekly feature. Wednesdays are now my day to post a mystery review. I have reviews planned all the way to the start of May, including some newly published books: The Case for Jaimie, Cave of Bones, and, Bad Neighbors

December:

November:

October:

September:

August:

July:

June:

May:

April:

March:

February:

January:

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The Lost Kingdom of Bamarre: 12/16/17

The Lost Kingdom of Bamarre by Gail Carson Levine

The Lost Kingdom of Bamarre by Gail Carson Levine is prequel to The Two Princesses of Bamarre (2001). Peregrine is the adopted daughter of Lord Tove and Lady Klausine. She is being raised as a Latki with the subjugated Bamarre as her servants (one of whom is her biological sister).

As she comes of age she begins to realize something is amiss and as she is to join her father on the front lines in battle, she is hit with the truth, that she is actually Bamarre. She has to chose — to hide that truth or use her position to help her people.

Peregrine's voice through out is very stilted. Granted it is there to portray the formality of the court and her position, but other Levine novels usually rely on more natural dialog, making her people — and her monsters — seem more alive.

The other problem is one of pacing. From the very beginning Peregrine relates her adoption. So when her "parents" require her to call them by very formal means, it sounds as is she already knows the secret. Later when she comes to learn the truth her shock doesn't play as genuine.

Two stars

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Orphan Island: 12/15/17

Orphan Island by Laurel Snyder

Laurel Snyder explains in the afterword of Orphan Island that she spent her time taking long baths dreaming about orphans on island. With that in mind, one shouldn't expect a logical, behind the curtain reveal of who is behind the boats that bring and take children to an island.

The book opens with Jinny becoming the newest elder, as her friend and mentor, Deen is taken away on the boat. Replacing him is a young girl — maybe three or four years old — who calls herself Ess.

Ess as the newest arrival is the living link to whatever the children leave behind when they come to the island. She remembers her mother. She is not — or was not until recently — an orphan. Ess resists assimilation into the island culture and every reason, albeit in little kid English, she gives, further compels Jinny to question how the island works.

The wherefore of the island is up to reader interpretation. There are clues of course: the dancing shapes, the limit on there being nine and only nine children at a time, the fact that the weather never changes and the island seems able to provide the food and shelter everyone needs. But there is also a crumbling library with books that only last so long. The island doesn't seem to provide new reading material or another clues about life outside the island.

To test the rules of the island, Jinny decides to stay even when a new child arrives after Ess. The sky doesn't fall exactly but things do change. The weather gets wacky. The island seems to struggle. Jinny hits puberty and doesn't know why she's bleeding.

While the title of the book is Orphan Island the promise of orphan magic is more ephemeral here. Clearly the island isn't natural. It could be artificial. It could be magic. From the limited knowledge we're giving — namely roughly nine years of rotation experience as children age and age out, and the new notes from the first children, there is no way of knowing the origin of the island. In this case, advanced technology might as well be magic.

Reading Orphan Island left me unsatisfied because we never get to see what Jinny sees once she finally decides to leave the island. Imagine if you will that Dorothy Gale had gone to Oz, done the Wizard's errands and been sent home without ever looking behind the curtain. Oz would have been a very different place, and probably a dead-end one.

Five stars

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Demon, Volume 4: 12/14/17

Demon, Volume 4 by Jason Shiga

Demon, Volume 4 by Jason Shiga concludes the tale of Jimmy and Sweatpea. When last we left our "heroes", they were isolated by what appeared to be insurmountable obstacles. Would they ever reunite? Would they ever manage beat the OSS and be truly free?

In my review of Volume 3, I said, "Jimmy is a scarecrow (one who guards the cornfield and can cross it) because his isolation isn't permanent." This volume illustrates why the cornfield (or the labyrinth, as referenced in the cover art of Volume 2) is a crucial source of power in the road not taken type of road narrative. It also explores the why and how orphans get their powers through this type of isolation.

Before I go on, though, if you haven't read the final volume and want to avoid spoilers — stop now. Though I will try to be careful in my analysis, a savvy reader will be able to infer plot points.

Back in September while rewatching season one of Westworld, I wrote an essay on the labyrinth in the road narrative, "The maze isn't for you — except when it is." The essay, though rough around the edges, was an exploration on how the cornfield is tied to the notion of mazes and labyrinths (and the minotaur).

Westworld and Demon are both escape from the labyrinth stories. Westworld uses the Celtic labyrinth as a metaphor for what separates the host from the guest — and if the host were only able to mediate on the greater meaning of the maze, would they be able to escape the labyrinth that is the park itself.

For Jimmy and Sweatpea — their incarceration exists in two forms: the physical, brought on by the OSS's various ways of locking them up; and metaphysical, brought on by not understanding how their possessions work. To beat the OSS, they have to understand how their possessions work.

But doing so has consequences. Just as there is one minotaur — one frightening abomination hidden within the maze, free to roam it, but not free to leave it. Two minotaurs might be twice as scary and dangerous — but if there were thousands or millions of them — they would be commonplace. The commonplace, even when dangerous, is far less of a threat than a singleton.

For Jimmy and Sweatpea — winning ultimately means giving up what makes them unique. They win destroying everyone not like them. Their solution is the extreme ending of Meanwhile (and it's probably no coincidence that book also features an "orphan" named Jimmy).

If you take down the barriers of the labyrinth or you cut down the cornfield and allow free passage between worlds; if you invite travelers on the road not traveled, you risk draining the magic or whatever it is that makes that otherworld special. I will have more thoughts along those lines when I post my analysis of Dorothy Must Die.

Five stars

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2017 books read and reviewed: 12/13/17

2017 books read and reviewed

My goal this year was to read and review a minimum of 52 newly published books. As of writing this post, I'm well over 100 books read and reviewed. I won't be able to review all of the 2017 published books I've read but I've done my best in years to keep that gap as narrow as possible. The remaining ones will be reviewed early next year.

I will update the December books at the end of the month.

December:

November:

October:

September:

August:

July:

June:

May:

April:

March:

February:

January:

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Murder on the Half Shelf: 12/13/17

Murder on the Half Shelf by Lorna Barrett

Murder on the Half Shelf by Lorna Barrett is the sixth book in the Booktown mystery series. I have been listening to this series as audiobooks, and this one is the first one after a change of publishers. The first five were produced by Penguin Audio and performed by Cassandra Campbell. Starting with book six, the publisher is Tantor Audio and the narrator is Karen White. After five books (or roughly two full days of hearing one actor and her different voices for the characters) some of my misgivings with this book may be due to the unfamiliarity of a new voice.

The Dragonfly Inn — no sorry — the Sheer Comfort Inn — is about to open and the Comforts are having a test run. They'd held a raffle at the Chamber of Commerce and invited the winners. Among those winners is Angelica. Still angry at Bob, she has invited Tricia instead. (I can't help but continue to see similarities with The Gilmore Girls.)

Before anyone is even settled in their rooms, Pippa Comfort is murdered. She's discovered by Sarge, Angelica's dog. And of course Tricia was the one holding the leash at the time.

Now with a murder set in a bed and breakfast, I expected most of the action to remain in the bed and breakfast. Sure, the town isn't that far away, but that is the usual course of action. Back in my review of Murder is Binding, I commented on how the book plays with expectations. The series continues to do that, especially here where everyone goes home to Stoneham rather than try to solve the mystery themselves. It's a more realistic approach but also, oddly, off-putting.

There are three agents keeping Tricia involved in the murder when she otherwise wouldn't need to be. The first is Sarge who seems to act as a furry McGuffin. Then there is Tricia's long lost first love, a man she has believed dead all these years and is now the prime suspect. Finally there is her maybe-boyfriend and newly appointed chief of police.

Beyond the disruption of having a different narrator for the audiobook, the inclusion of a suddenly rediscovered long lost boyfriend was a hard detail to swallow. I realize that the Sheer Comfort Inn is out of town but it seems hard to believe that after nearly three years of living and working and snooping around Stoneham and its neighboring towns, Tricia would some how be oblivious to the fact that her ex-boyfriend is living under an assumed name.

The other odd bit to Murder on the Half Shelf is the B plot. The marriage between Mr. Everett and Grace has hit a snag — namely the charitable foundation Grace is running. Keeping the two of them apart besides the work of running the foundation and screening applicants, is Pixie — a former prostitute turned secretary and bouncer. There's a lot of time spent on Pixie being the worst (or best) receptionist ever and White does a great almost Annie Potts at her most Jeanine type voice for her. She's a memorable character who probably needs her own series of books. Regardless, so much effort was put into creating her character it was fairly obvious that she wouldn't be a one time only character.

And that comes down to other reason why I took a star off. Sure, it's still enjoyable and the mystery itself was compelling — though the solution was a bit left field, a la Miss Marple (Christie's sleuth, not Tricia's cat) who never seems to share what she knows with the reader. The biggest flaw in this volume was its pacing. The obvious plot parts were obvious. The filler parts were obviously filler. There wasn't enough in the way of natural segues to give the story an organic feel.

Four stars

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Boundless: 12/12/17

Boundless by Jillian Tamaki

Boundless by Jillian Tamaki is a comic collection or a short story collection in comic form, if you will. The stories have a Twilight Zone feel to them — playing out various what-ifs.

The opening story tells of a woman who ties her love life to a cult classic film. Each romantic breakup, it seems, coincides with the death of another actor in the film. Is the film cursed? Is she?

Another story follows a woman who notices she's losing weight — and later height and volumes. She is shrinking. This comic is about how her life changes as she gets smaller.

All the stories are memorable and each is done with a different artistic approach. It's really like nothing else I've read — certainly not one by a single graphic novel author.

Five stars

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Beast & Crown: 12/11/17

Beast & Crown by Joel Ross

Beast & Crown by Joel Ross is a new fantasy about a quest to save a brother enslaved by a textile factory. Ross, who lives in Santa Barbara, again draws from a familiar landscape, crafting a fantasy kingdom. To anyone who has lived in California or is familiar with the central coast, there is a recognizable mix of influences: Spanish, American, Chinese, Japanese but populated also with ogres, goblins, trolls and the like. If Ankh-Morpork is a multi-decade fantasy London, this is fantasy Moorpark.

This ensemble cast includes, Sally, a maid who has been saving up to rescue her brother; Ji, a boot boy who is good at sneaking around because he has to have access throughout the house to collect everyone's boots; and Roz, the governess who is well educated and liberally minded.

Like Pratchett did in his later books with the trolls — beginning really with Snuff, Ross does his most interesting social commentary in the disconnect between the story of how the Summer Queen saved the kingdom by smiting the monsters and the rich, nuanced cultural reality of these non-human species. Ross isn't recapitulating Pratchett — just using well known fantasy populations to explore a number of different issues.

Looking at the cover and taking into account the set up I've given, it may seem like I'm talking about a completely different book. I'm not. The scene on the cover is in the book — and it's a marvelous one. To explain it, though, would to spoil some of the best surprises.

The conclusion, The Ice Witch comes out on August 21, 2018.

Five stars

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Diverse books reviewed in 2017: 12/11/17

Diverse books reviewed in 2017

In January I talked about my desire to diversify my reading. The goal was to reach the point where half of all the books I read and review (or 150 books read, 180 reviewed) would be inclusive. My definition of inclusive or diverse continues to evolve, with more emphasis being on the authors. In this post I'm trying to do two things: look at what I've read and reviewed, and to be accountable for where I could have done a better job.

As this month (and thus this year) isn't ever, I will update the December list as the month progresses.

December:

November:

October:

September:

August:

July:

June:

May:

April:

March:

February:

January:

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It's Monday! What Are You Reading? (December 11): 12/11/17

It's Monday! What Are You Reading? (December 11)
Hosted by Kathryn of Book Date.

While our family was up visiting, my mother in law started talking about some old family photos she and her brother had found. They have been working on trying to put names to faces and build a family tree but my mother in law isn't satisfied with the results they've gotten. My great uncle has been managing a family tree through a website — and our library also offers (albeit limited) access to that same site. I blithely volunteered to poke around the site to see if I could find some better info.

I ended up upgrading my membership so I could become the manager of the Sammis family tree. Her side of the family has been very tricky. While the records offered through the family tree site have been helpful, I've also had to rely on digitized old phone books and the marriage records offered by the Denver Public Library. In the process I ended up finding three American born younger siblings of my husband's great grandfather!

What I read:

Insignificant Events in the Life of a Cactus Demon Volume 4 Book Clubbed Girl with a Camera Posted Restart Speed of Life Not a Sound

  • Insignificant Events in the Life of a Cactus by Dusti Bowling; library book
  • Demon Volume 4 by Jason Shiga; personal collection
  • Book Clubbed by Lorna Barrett (audio book); personal collection
  • Girl with a Camera by Carolyn Meyer; library book
  • Posted by John David Anderson; library book
  • Restart by Gordon Korman; library book
  • Speed of life by Carol Weston; library book
  • Not a Sound by Heather Gudenkauf; library book

What I'm reading:

Player Piano Wildlife Photographer of the Year: Portfolio 25 Patina A Fatal Chapter

  • Player Piano by Kurt Vonnegut Jr.; personal collection
  • Wildlife Photographer of the Year: Portfolio 25 by Rosamund Kidman Cox (editor); personal collection
  • Patina by Jason Reynolds; personal collection
  • A Fatal Chapter by Lorna Barret; library book (audio)

Up Next:

The Coffee Book Family Game Night and Other Catastrophes Finding Perfect Click'd

  • The Coffee Book: Anatomy of an Industry from Crop to the Last Drop by Gregory Dicum and Nina Luttinger
  • Family Game Night and Other Catastrophes by Mary E. Lambert
  • Finding Perfect by Elly Swartz
  • Click'd by Tamara Ireland Stone

Posts:

November Sources

Reviews Posted

Piecing Me Together Hear the Wolves Beyond the Bright Sea Paper Girls 3 The Great Shelby Holmes Meets Her Match Macy McMillan and the Rainbow Goddess Smarty Marty Steps Up Her Game

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Piecing Me Together: 12/10/17

Piecing Me Together by Renée Watson

Piecing Me Together by Renée Watson is set in Portland, Oregon. It's told from the perspective of Jade, a Black teen who is coming into her own as a collage artist. She has grown up believing she has to escape her neighborhood if she is to make anything of her life. That means going across town to a better school, going abroad in school, so she can later get a scholarship to a college.

But everything seems stacked against her. Her teacher and guidance counsellor expect her to participate in a mentoring program before she would even be considered for the study abroad program. It doesn't matter that she's already one of the best students in the Spanish program. She's Black. She's poor. Therefore she has to prove herself in ways that her White counterparts don't have to.

Does it piss her off? You bet it does. But she also gets access to things she would never get on her mother's income. She gets to go to museums and art galleries and meet people who are interested in her art. But it's also tearing her apart from the one person who has her back more than anyone else — her mother. That's hard to recognize though when her mother is strict when she's home and absent often because of her long hours of work.

Five stars

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Hear the Wolves: 12/09/17

Hear the Wolves by Victoria Scott

Hear the Wolves by Victoria Scott is about a left behind group of people trying to reach safety during a snow storm, being pursued by wolves. Per the endnotes, the novel was inspired by a dream and the jumps the plot's in logic show that origin. But the novel is set in Alaska and that real world setting doesn't mesh well with the narrative flow.

Sloan is a hunter but she's also deaf in one ear. For reasons not really stated, her mother left the family. So Sloan's been raised by her father and older brother. Except one morning she wakes up and they are gone — with a note that she should be able to take care of her self while they are out on a routine errand.

Sloan though panics and goes into town, finding it mostly abandoned except for a few stragglers — people either too old to go, or children who have no reason to go. Is this a dystopian future? No — everyone has left to go vote.

Vote? Really? It was at this detail that book basically lost me. Sure, Alaska is remote. But given that modern technology is mentioned including satellite weather, computers, and so forth, this isn't the days when voting might have required leaving the village.

Curious — I looked up how voting works in Alaska. Like California, they allow anyone to vote by mail regardless of situation. Right there, that means there's no reason a remote village would need to head somewhere else en masse to vote.

Now while the majority of the town is out somewhere else to vote, the stragglers are faced with two problems — a blizzard, and hungry wolves. They are in a town. A town that has doors with locks. They have supplies. They probably have ways to communicate with the absent adults, and with emergency services.

Thinking back to The Long Winter by Laura Ingalls Wilder, homesteaders went to the town to get supplies. Yes there were shortages, but this happened after days and days of snow and the delay of the supply train due to the blizzard. It didn't happen within hours of the adult population leaving.

In all this messy set up is the lesson that human encroachment on wildlife has forced animals into urban areas. There are coyotes in Golden Gate Park, for example. So wolves coming into the town during a blizzard is to be expected.

But this isn't about wolves in a temporarily underpopulated village. Instead the remaining people — who could easily ration whatever is in the town and hang out together in a home, or a hotel, or a pub (a la Shaun of the Dead except with wolves instead of zombies), they decide to head out to a hunting shelter because there's food and ammunition there.

Really? They are in a village and they can't find any food or ammunition? And if they stayed in the village and just locked the damn doors, they wouldn't have to worry about the wolves. Wolves don't have opposable thumbs!

All of these ginormous plot holes could have been avoided if the setting were somewhere completely imaginary. If the village were in a fantasy setting or a horror one — the sudden disappearance of the people, the lack of supplies, and the need to leave the village could be explained away.

Two stars

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Beyond the Bright Sea: 12/08/17

Beyond the Bright Sea by Lauren Wolk

Beyond the Bright Sea by Lauren Wolk is set on a fictional island off Cape Cod, near Penikese. It's set in 1923-1924, putting it in a contemporary narrative space with the "yarns" that Joseph C Lincoln was writing set in his own fictional landscape of the Cape Cod area. As I've ready and loved so many of his books, it was impossible not to listen to this audio without populating the book with his characters and landscape.

Crow has lived on the island with Osh for her entire life. She's not entire sure how old she is or when her birthday is because she's a foundling. She washed ashore in a dingy as a new born baby. She also has Miss Maggie in her life, a no nonsense woman who lives by herself and isn't prone to the superstitions that other islanders are.

Because everyone believes Crow came from Penikese, they believe she could have brought Leprosy from the island. It doesn't matter that for her entire life she hasn't shown any symptoms of it. If she could be from there, she's sick. And so her immediate world is Osh, Miss Maggie, and Mouse (the cat).

Eventually though, smart children start to question the world. They question where they come from. They crave the story of how they came to be. For Crow that means discovering if she is in fact from Penikese. That means learning everything she can about the Leper colony and the people who lived and died there.

Now here is where things come together like a Joseph C. Lincoln novel again. Lincoln's books were often about the gruff retired man, home from a life at sea, who wishes nothing more than a quiet life on his piece of the island, who for circumstances out of his control is suddenly paired with a foundling. With the help of a neighbor woman, he and she manage to make a family out of their unusual situation, only to have their quiet shattered by the intrusion of danger: a conman, a thief, an dangerous long-lost relative, etc.

Beyond the Bright Sea reminds me most of Cy Whitaker's Place set in 1908 Bayport. Cap'n Cy has returned after decades at sea but is soon left to take in recently orphaned Emily. Just as Osh nicknames his castaway as "Crow", Cy names his charge, "Bos'n." Where Cy has to protect Bos'n from an abusive father, Osh and Miss Maggie have to protect Crow and themselves from a dangerous man from the south who is searching for something he believes Crow has.

In all of this adventure, the Elizabeth Islands and nearby New Bedford are as much characters as Crow, Osh, Miss Maggie, and Mouse are. The urban hustle and bustle of New Bedford is less idealized in Beyond the Bright Sea than it (or its fictional equivalents) is in Lincoln's novels. While he and his characters were islanders too, he didn't set the islands apart quite as starkly.

There's an interesting afterword read by the author that's worth listening to at the end of of the audiobook. She explains the inspiration of the story and the many changes that Penikese has gone through since the close of the novel.

Five stars

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Paper Girls, Volume 3: 12/07/17

Paper Girls, Volume 3 by Brian K. Vaughan

Paper Girls Volume 3 by Brian K. Vaughan collects issues eleven through fifteen. The teens are now somewhen else in time. I read it as being the far future but the time traveler who meets up with them says it's the far past.

Mostly this sequence focuses on helping a local save her child. He is the product of rape by one of the three brutes. Beyond the how to get home and what's going on plot, there is some serious discussion of what it means to be a child, an adult, surviving abuse.

Then on the scifi side of things, there is the when are we, what's going on and how do we get home? We learn where the message from volume two comes from.

Volume four which collects issues sixteen through twenty comes out on April 10, 2018.

Five stars

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The Great Shelby Holmes Meets Her Match: 12/06/17

The Great Shelby Holmes Meets Her Match by Elizabeth Eulberg

The Great Shelby Holmes Meets Her Match by Elizabeth Eulberg is the second Shelby Holmes book. John and Shelby are in school now and their teacher, Mr. Crosby is acting weird. Things get worse when the teacher's watch is stolen and the thief is trying to blackmail him into failing Shelby.

Whenever a Holmes meets their match — two names come instantly to mind: Irene Adler and James Moriarty. In the grand scheme of the original books and stories, neither character is the arch nemesis that they have become in the eyes of the fandom and the pastiches and homages and remakes and adaptations. Both characters did outsmart Holmes but neither were super-villains.

In recent adaptations, Adler and Moriatry are often paired together (example: Sherlock) or are made into the same person (example: Elementary). Eulberg takes that expectation and plays it to her advantage: making Adler the namesake for an exclusive girls school in New York City, and a particular student from the school as the Moriarty stand in, while borrowing much of the plot of the first Sherlock Holmes short story, "A Scandal in Bohemia" (coming after two novels: A Study in Scarlet and the Sign of Four, both of which were inspirations for the first Shelby Holmes novel.

The mystery itself — that of the missing watch and the reason behind the watch are there to set up the Adler trained Moriarty stand-in for this series. As the major characters in the series have been recast as children (or in the case of Watson, split into two: an adult doctor and a child blogger), this nemesis's potential to be all powerful is somewhat limited, but she is still dangerous: because of her lack of empathy, her access to money, and her long runs of unsupervised freedom. I'm hoping though that future volumes will draw from the episodic mysteries.

Five stars

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Macy McMillan and the Rainbow Goddess: 12/05/17

Macy McMillan and the Rainbow Goddess by Shari Green

Macy McMillan and the Rainbow Goddess by Shari Green is a novel in freeform poetry about a girl trying to come to terms with the big changes in her life. Big changes coming: a new school at the end of sixth grade, a new house, a step dad, and step-siblings (twins).

When Macy refuses to pack her own things, her mother sends her next door to help her neighbor sort and pack her books. It's through her interactions with Iris that we get to learn the most about Macy.

Macy is deaf. She knows sign language. So does her mother. She used to go a school for the deaf but has been in a mainstream elementary school for the last four years. She has an ASL translator at school. She loves to read — just like her next door neighbor.

We also learn about Macy through her voracious reading. Books mentioned include: The Tale of Despereaux by Kate DiCamillo, El Deafo by Cece Bell, and Anne of Green Gables by LM Montgomery.

The poetry and type face help to express both Macy's emotional state and the rhythm of sign. ASL has its own grammar — something that is lost when writing out dialog into standard prose. By keeping the lines short and focused on the core actions, items, emotions — there's more of a sense of how Macy is actually thinking and expressing herself.

Macy can also talk. Her mother, neighbor, and best friend (who she has a fight with for most of the book) also can talk. When people are using spoken dialog, it's show in its entirety as bolded text.

Though Macy's town is never given a name, there are enough clues to suppose it's somewhere on the north eastern edge of Vancouver Island. The author is from there and it shows in how she lays out the geography of Macy's world.

Five stars

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Walking with Miss Millie: 12/04/17

Walking with Miss Millie by Tamara Bundy

Walking with Miss Millie by Tamara Bundy is set in 1968 in Rainbow, Georgia. Alice, her brother and mother have recently moved into her grandmother's house to help her live with her worsening dementia. Alice misses her friend and resents that she now has to be her brother's keeper as he is deaf and has been pulled out of his special school, into a public school that can't provide an ASL translator.

Next door to grandma's house is Millie Mills — who as she's an elderly widow I would call Mrs. Mills. But this is Georgia and Millie is Black — the only one in the neighborhood. She had worked in the house as a housekeeper and when the White owner died, she left the house to Millie.

Millie is a lot like the elderly neighbor who teaches Armstrong the basics of running a business. The different in those two books, is that Armstrong's mentor is one of age to youth — and not the trope of wise Black person to naive White child. Were the story only about what Alice learns from Millie I would be rating the book with few stars.

But there is Alice's deaf brother and her relationship to him. Here in Rainbow he spends a lot of his time in his own world. He likes to play bus — and carries around a plate that he uses to drive. The odd behavior combined with his silence and apparent inattention makes him appear autistic. A lot of this book is Alice getting over the anger of her situation and the growing realization of her brother's isolation and a growing empathy.

Next there is Alice's relationship with the bullies of the block. There are a group of brothers who torment her and her brother. They hide her bike. The call her brother names. They also happen to have a sister who has become friends with Alice. Through the sister and the younger brother who isn't as hell bent on bullying as the older boys, Alice comes to understand why the older brothers are as awful as they are. It comes down to a mixture of poverty and child abuse.

So it's for the world building of this neighborhood in fictional Rainbow that the book earns its five stars. I also happened to listen to the audiobook, read by Catherine Taber. Her performance definitely added depth to this novel.

Five stars

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It's Monday! What Are You Reading? (December 04): 12/04/17

It's Monday! What Are You Reading? (December 04)
Hosted by Kathryn of Book Date.

The second Thanksgiving with our So. Cal. relatives was so much fun! It was also the first time in fifteen years that we had room for houses guests to stay the night.

I finished Nanowrimo a couple days early. My novel, plot-wise, is only about a quarter finished. I will keep going with it either on my own over the next few months. If I don't, I'll pick up part two next November.

Cybils round one is wrapping up. We're starting to think about what day we're going to meet to make our short list. It's been a good year of reading.

Now that the new year is rapidly approaching, I've started planning out my reading for 2018. Books I'm currently excited about include:

  • Black Hammer, Volume 2: The Event by Jeff Lemire
  • Now That You Mention It by Kristan Higgins
  • The Terrible Two Go Wild by Mac Barnet and Jory John
  • Love Hate and Other Filters by Samira Ahmed
  • Let's Talk About Love by Claire Kann
  • Wiskerella by Ursula Vernon
  • American Panda by Gloria Chao
  • The Grave's a Fine and Private Place by Alan Bradley
  • Dragon Overnight by Sarah Mlynowski et. al
  • The Belles by Dhonielle Clayton
  • Voltron, Volume 2: The Pilgrimage by Tim Hendrick
  • Tess of the Road by Rachel Hartman
  • The Poet X by Elizabeth Acevedo
  • The Case for Jamie by Brittany Cavallaro
  • Tyler Johnson Was Here by Jay Coles
  • Bat and the Waiting Game by Elana K. Arnold
  • Space Opera by Catherynne M. Valente
  • Cave of Bones by Anne Hillerman
  • Paper Girls, Volume 4 by Brian K. Vaughan
  • The Orphan Band of Springdale by Anne Nesbet
  • Love & Fargo by Melissa de la Cruz

What I read:

Kitty Cornered Braced Caleb and Kit The Many Reflections of Miss Jane Deming The Someday Birds How Dare the Sun Rise: Memoirs of a War Child Adventure on Whalebone Island

  • Kitty Cornered: How Frannie and Five Other Incorrigible Cats Seized Control of Our House and Made It Their Home by Bob Tarte; library book
  • Braced by Alyson Gerber; library book
  • Caleb and Kit by Beth Vrabel; personal collection / audiobook
  • The Many Reflections of Miss Jane Deming by J. Anderson Coats; library book
  • The Someday Birds by Sally J. Pla; library book
  • How Dare the Sun Rise: Memoirs of a War Child by Sandra Uwiringiyimana and Abigail Pesta; library book
  • Adventure on Whalebone Island by M.A. Wilson; personal collection

What I'm reading:

Player Piano Insignificant Events in the Life of a Cactus Demon Volume 4 Book Clubbed

  • Player Piano by Kurt Vonnegut Jr.; personal collection
  • Insignificant Events in the Life of a Cactus by Dusti Bowling; library book
  • Demon Volume 4 by Jason Shiga; personal collection
  • Book Clubbed by Lorna Barrett (audio book); personal collection

Up Next:

Wildlife Photographer of the Year: Portfolio 25 Patina Girl with a Camera Posted

  • Wildlife Photographer of the Year: Portfolio 25 by Rosamund Kidman Cox (editor); personal collection
  • Patina by Jason Reynolds; personal collection
  • Girl with a Camera by Carolyn Meyer; library book
  • Posted by John David Anderson; library book

Posts:

November Summary Reading Goals 2018

Reviews Posted

Lucky Broken Girl One Last Word Carrying Albert Home How Mirka Caught a Fish Murder is Bad Manners We Are the Engineers Smarty Marty Steps Up Her Game

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Lucky Broken Girl: 12/03/17

Lucky Broken Girl by Ruth Behar

Lucky Broken Girl by Ruth Behar is an autobiographical novel inspired by the author's time spent in a full body cast in the early 1960s. The time covered in this novel is about two and a half years.

Ruthie Mizrahi and her family have emigrated to New York City from Cuba. With the help of her neighbor and classmate from Indian, the two of them rise out of the "dumb class" — the class for English learners.

From there it seems everything is up. They're pulling their own in the regular class. Ruthie is the neighborhood queen of hopscotch. Her Papi has bought the family a beautiful new car.

And then everything goes horribly wrong. There's an accident. People die. The car is destroyed. Ruthie ends up in a full body cast. She's left at home with her mother's care and a tutor from the school.

The bulk of Lucky Broken Girl is about Ruthie's recovery. It comes with soul searching. It comes with anger. It comes with homesickness for Cuba. It comes with her secular Judaism — and lessons learned from her Yiddish speaking grandmother.

Because it's based on actual events, it's not a picture perfect story. It's messy. It can rely on tropes or stereotypes. While it has a happy ending, there's a lot of anger and heartbreak in between.

Lucky Broken Girl is still relevant with its themes of immigration. It presents people as more than singular elements of their culture. Ruthie is a full realized, believable child. She is relatable.

Five stars

Comments (2)


One Last Word: Wisdom from the Harlem Renaissance: 12/02/17

One Last Word: Wisdom from the Harlem Renaissance by Nikki Grimes

One Last Word: Wisdom from the Harlem Renaissance by Nikki Grimes is a collection of poetry from and inspired by the Harlem Renaissance. The foreword explains the starting point, Langston Hugh's poem "Mother to Son," which she originally thought was called "No crystal stair" for the repetition of that imagery at the start and finish of the poem.

The book is a mixture of new and old poetry. Mother to Son is one of the older poems included in the mix, for anyone not immediately familiar with it.

Many of Grimes's new poems included bolded words at the end of each line. When those lines are read by themselves, they form a shorter, pithier takeaway for the poem. At first these messages are short statements about being strong, about resisting, about pride and self worth even in the current state of affairs.

But they build to longer, self contained poems. The book closes on a reprise of Mother to Son, written in the voice of a now much older woman. When the ending words in each line are read, they are the original "Mother to Son."

Five stars

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November 2017 Summary: 12/02/17

Inclusive reading report

November was the quietest month we've had this year. Midway through we turned in the keys to the apartment we had rented as a stopgap between selling the condo and buying the house. The move is done. We still need to furnish the house — as we've moved into a place that's twice the size of the condo we had lived in for the last thirteen years.

With the Cybils in full swing, much of my reading in November was focused on middle grade fiction published between October 2016 and September 2017. In previous years the entirety of my November reading has been for the Cybils. This year, I was able to include some reading from my own wishlist.

The previous November I finished thirty-one books. This November I finished only twenty-six. That reflects the first week where I was still spending most of my time getting the apartment ready to handover to the leasing office. I primarily listened to audiobooks while cleaning, and those take more time to read than the printed ones.

Another slow down in my reading was time spent participating in NANOWRIMO. I finished a couple days early, although plot-wise, the story is about a quarter finished. With a sustained slowing of my reading, my review buffer is basically dried up. By spring, I'll be running in place, a blogging position I haven't been in for more than a decade.

November was the fifth month in a row where diverse / inclusive books made up the majority of my reading. On the reviewing side, those diverse books are making their way into my reviews. November's reviews reached the fifty-fifty mark with fifteen reviews being of diverse books.

December will be filled with the last of the Cybils reading for the first two or three weeks. The remainder will be of books I purchased in 2017 and haven't gotten to. After five months of reading diversely, I'm fairly certain I will continue doing so. Reviews will primarily be remaining books published this year that I haven't managed to review yet.

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Carrying Albert Home: 12/01/17

Carrying Albert Home by Homer Hickam

Carrying Albert Home by Homer Hickam is a fictionalized account of the author's parents taking a road trip from West Virginia to Florida to return Albert to his native state. I read it as part of my road narrative project but rather quickly decided it wasn't relevant to the direction my research has gone.

There's a dryness that creeps into these types of books — written from the distance of nearly forgotten memories, or secondhand stories. Sometimes it works — They Came in from the Road — being an example. And sometimes it doesn't.

There's a certain absurdity worked into this story — a couple owning an alligator and then taking him back to Florida in a washtub in the backseat of their car. That visual combined with the matter of fact narration left me imagining Daniel Pinkwater reading the book in same fashion he read The Neddiad. I found that mental exercise distracting.

Things weren't helped any when the couple stops to pick up a hitchhiking John Steinbeck. Whether or not they actually picked him up is immaterial. In terms of the narrative, Steinbeck is like the historical figure of the week in the Murdoch Mysteries. Steinbeck, though, as the radicalizing force in Elsie's life, comes off as a nonfictional Melvin the Shaman.

Two stars

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