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Month in review

Reviews
Akata Witch by Nnedi Okorafor
Avatar: The Last Airbender - North and South, Part Two by Gene Luen Yang
Bird & Squirrel On Fire by James Burks
Bird & Squirrel on the Edge! by James Burks
Captain Coconut and the Case of the Missing Bananas by Anushka Ravishankar and Priya Sundram
Dead Beat by Jim Butcher
Dreadnought by April Daniels
Edible Numbers by Jennifer Vogel Bass
Extraordinary by Miriam Spitzer Franklin
Extreme Babymouse by Jennifer L. Holm
Fenway and Hattie and the Evil Bunny Gang by Victoria J. Coe
The 52-Story Treehouse by Andy Griffiths and Terry Denton
Giant Days, Volume 1 by John Allison
The Girl from Everywhere by Heidi Heilig
The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms by N.K. Jemisin
If I Was Your Girl by Meredith Russo
Lily and Dunkin by Donna Gephart
March: Book One by John Lewis, Andrew Aydin and Nate Powell
The Maypop Kidnapping by C. M. Surrisi
New Cat by Yangsook Choi
Oh! by Kevin Henkes
Quiet! by Paul Bright
Rock with Wings by Anne Hillerman
Roller Girl by Victoria Jamieson
The Thrilling Adventures of Lovelace and Babbage: The (Mostly) True Story of the First Computer by Sydney Padua
Toto Trouble: Back to Crass by Thierry Coppée
Towers Falling by Jewell Parker Rhodes
The Wild Robot by Peter Brown

Miscellaneous
The February 2017 Gap
Seven narrative ways to travel
Thanks for the Memoirs

Previous month

Rating System

5 stars: Completely enjoyable or compelling
4 stars: Good but flawed
3 stars: Average
2 stars: OK
1 star: Did not finish

Reading Challenges

My Kind of Mystery Reading Challenge 2017 February - January 2017-8



The Thrilling Adventures of Lovelace and Babbage: The (Mostly) True Story of the First Computer: 02/12/17

The Thrilling Adventures of Lovelace and Babbage: The (Mostly) True Story of the First Computer by Sydney Padua

The Thrilling Adventures of Lovelace and Babbage: The (Mostly) True Story of the First Computer by Sydney Padua is a graphic novel that explores the lives of Ada, Countess of Lovelace and Charles Babbage and then extrapolates an alternate, steampunk timeline based on their work on the difference machine.

The first chapter or adventure or issue, if you want to treat it like a compilation of comic books, is a straight up biography of Lovelace and Babbage. It's still humorous but it's far cry from the tangential exercises and general mayhem that follows.

Ponies + Statistics = :D

Maybe it's just me, but the way Lovelace and Babbage are drawn remind me of Mary Shelley and Victor Frankenstein. Babbage, especially later on, is show in the same sort of double breasted lab coat that Dr. Frankenstein wears.

In the later adventures — the pocket dimension of what if — the two team up and receive a huge grant from Queen Victoria. In the name of crime fighting and betting on ponies, they build a warehouse sized difference machine. It's so large that one can easily get lost inside. It's probably a steam driven TARDIS.

The book is both educational and riotously funny.

Five stars

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