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Month in review

Reviews
American Road Narratives: Reimagining Mobility in Literature and Film by Ann Brigham
Author: A True Story by Helen Lester
The Big Roads by Earl Swift
Bull by David Elliott
Chopping Spree by Diane Mott Davidson
The Genius of Birds by Jennifer Ackerman
Giant Days, Volume 4 by John Allison, Max Sarin, and Whitney Cogar
Hannah and the Homunculus by Kurt Hassler
The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas
Hilda and the Stone Forest by Luke Pearson
I Am Not Sidney Poitier by Percival Everett
I Say Tomato by Katie Wall
Instructions by Neil Gaiman and Charles Vess
Jem and the Holograms, Volume 3: Dark Jem by Kelly Thompson
The Long Cosmos by Terry Pratchett and Stephen Baxter
Lucky Boy by Shanthi Sekaran
Lunch Lady and the Field Trip Fiasco by Jarrett J. Krosoczka
Mayday by Karen Harrington
The Minotaur Takes a Cigarette Break by Steven Sherrill
Ms. Marvel, Vol. 1: No Normal by G. Willow Wilson
National Audubon Society Guide to Landscape Photography by Tim Fitzharris
Needled to Death by Maggie Sefton
Noragami Volume 03 by Adachitoka
Over the Ocean by Taro Gomi
Red Hook Road by Ayelet Waldman
Skybreaker by Kenneth Oppel
Ten Things We Did by Sarah Mlynowski
Tip of the Tongue by Patrick Ness
Triangle by Mac Barnett and Jon Klassen
Tru & Nelle by G. Neri
The White Road of the Moon by Rachel Neumeier

Miscellaneous
It's Monday! What Are You Reading? (July 03)
It's Monday! What Are You Reading? (July 10)
It's Monday! What Are You Reading? (July 24)
It's Monday! What Are You Reading? (July 31)
June 2017 Reading Report June 2017 Reading Sources

Previous month

Rating System

5 stars: Completely enjoyable or compelling
4 stars: Good but flawed
3 stars: Average
2 stars: OK
1 star: Did not finish

Reading Challenges

My Kind of Mystery Reading Challenge 2017 February - January 2017-8



Bull: 07/15/17

Bull  by David Elliott

Bull by David Elliott is a poetic retelling of Theseus and the Minotaur. Each of the main characters get their own poetic style and voice and the book alternates between.

Elliott uses modern language including profanity to rework this story into compelling snippets. It's a fun, sometimes crass (but so is the source material) modernization of a Greek myth. It should appeal to teens who grew up reading Percy Jackson and are looking for something edgier.

The book itself is also well crafted, designed to further draw the reader into the story. Above ground, the text is presented in a standard fashion: black typeface on white paper. As Asterion is imprisoned and begins his descent into madness and transformation into the blood lusting beast we know as the minotaur, the pages go through a gradient, slowly getting darker and darker until it's white typeface on black pages.

I chose this book to further explore the relationship of the Minotaur and labyrinth to the American road narrative — specifically the crossing the cornfield and road not taken categories. Bull serves as a good counterpoint to The Minotaur Takes a Cigarette Break to see how jaded M came to be — how he was once an idealistic child (despite is bovine features), named Asterion (ruler of the stars).

Five stars

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