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Month in review

Reviews
Big Dog...Little Dog: A Bedtime Story by P.D. Eastman
The Book Stops Here by Kate Carlisle
By Motor to the Golden Gate by Emily Post
Chapter and Hearse by Lorna Barrett
Cleopatra in Space: The Golden Lion by Mike Maihack
Cotton Tenants: Three Families by James Agee
Crafty Cat and the Crafty Camp Crisis by Charise Mericle Harper
The Flying Troutmans by Miriam Toews
The Fog by Kyo Maclear
The Great Good Summer by Liz Garton Scanlon
Lumberjanes, Volume 2: Friendship to the Max by Noelle Stevenson
Max Versus The Cube by Hanne Türk
Once Upon a Thriller by Carolyn Keene
The Painted Queen by Elizabeth Peters and Joan Hess
A Perfect Day by Lane Smith
Practical Artistry: Light & Exposure for Digital Photographers by Harold Davis
Race to the Bottom of the Sea by Lindsay Eagar
Say No to Murder by Nancy Pickard
Sentenced to Death by Lorna Barrett
Under the Dragon's Tail by Maureen Jennings
Watch the Sky by Kirsten Hubbard

Miscellaneous
It's Monday! What Are You Reading? (October 02)
It's Monday! What Are You Reading? (October 09)
It's Monday! What Are You Reading? (October 16)
September 2017 Sources
September 2017 Summary

Previous month

Rating System

5 stars: Completely enjoyable or compelling
4 stars: Good but flawed
3 stars: Average
2 stars: OK
1 star: Did not finish

Reading Challenges

My Kind of Mystery Reading Challenge 2017 February - January 2017-8



The Great Good Summer: 10/01/17

The Great Good Summer by Liz Garton Scanlon

The Great Good Summer by Liz Garton Scanlon is a contemporary novel set when the last space shuttle was flown across the country on the back of a 747 for one last hurrah.

Ivy and her best friend Paul meanwhile are trying to get to Florida to find her mother. She has run off with a traveling shyster named Hallelujah Dave. So they buy a bus ticket and head east.

It's a reverse road trip fueled by faith, poor parenting, and poor decision making. Maybe because I've never lived near a bus terminal, I find these running away by bus plots difficult to believe, especially for protagonists that are barely teenagers. Growing up in the suburbs, it would have taken me an hour (by express) or two hours by regular city bus to get to the Greyhound terminal.

Here's a book that takes a change, a point of evolution, if you will, in NASA's approach to space science, and pits it against blind, stupefying faith in sort of cage match. I'm not sure there's a clear winner in this book. For a better examination of faith, femininism and science, within the same setting, I recommend The Evolution of Calpurnia Tate by Jacqueline Kelly.

Two stars

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