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Month in review

Reviews
Adventure on Whalebone Island by M.A. Wilson
Black Hammer Volume 2: The Event by Jeff Lemire
Ghostbusters 101: Everyone Answers the Call by Erik Burnham and Dan Schoening
Habibi by Craig Thompson
If You Find This by Matthew Baker
Juana and Lucas by Juana Medina
Locke & Key, Volume 2: Head Games by Joe Hill
Not the Killing Type by Lorna Barrett
Now That You Mention It by Kristan Higgins
Otis and the Scarecrow by Loren Long
Patina by Jason Reynolds
Pierre the Maze Detective: The Search for the Stolen Maze Stone by Hiro Kamigaki
A Pug's Tale by Alison Pace
Sabotage at Willow Woods by Carolyn Keene
Sunflower House by Eve Bunting
Teddy Mars: Almost a World Record Breaker by Molly B. Burnham
The Terrible Two Go Wild by Mac Barnett, Jory John, and Kevin Cornell
Things Too Huge to Fix by Saying Sorry by Susan Vaught
Welcome to the Real World by Angela Melick

Miscellaneous
December 2017 Sources
December 2017 Summary
Five stars in 2017
It's Monday, What Are You Reading (January 01)
It's Monday, What Are You Reading (January 08)
It's Monday, What Are You Reading (January 15)

Road Essays
The transformative power of the cornfield: magic in the Marvelous Land of Oz

Previous month

Rating System

5 stars: Completely enjoyable or compelling
4 stars: Good but flawed
3 stars: Average
2 stars: OK
1 star: Did not finish


A Pug's Tale: 01/03/18

A Pug's Tale by Alison Pace

Back in 2008 I reviewed the first of Alison Pace's pug novels, Pug Hill. I didn't give it the best of reviews, complaining there wasn't much there for a 312 page novel. Put in perspective, I was swamped with reading tons of review copies, trying to keep a rigid schedule of posting, and being the parent of two young, rambunctious children.

But there was a positive feeling lingering too. And over time only the positive feelings remained. So I've gone back to Hope and Max to read of their next adventure in A Pug's Tale.

Hope works for the Metropolitan Museum of Art, cleaning and restoring paintings. A wealthy, eccentric woman is donating a pile of dough to the museum and in return, the board is letting her host a pug party. Since Hope brings her pug, Max, to work on a regular basis, she doesn't see the harm in crashing the party with him.

During the mayhem a painting is removed and delivered to the Hope's department. Of course she quickly sees that the painting is a forgery, albeit, a damn good one. Before calling the police or alerting anyone else, her boss decides that they should figure out what happened to the original by themselves.

The clues themselves aren't traditional mystery clues, not even cosy mystery clues. These are more caper clues in that each clue is designed as part of a greater treasure hunt. The nature of crime and the nature of the clues, makes the who behind the crime pretty obvious but it's still a fun read. Even Hope is well aware of who is probably behind it. But she still feels compelled to follow the clues.

It's a charming and goofy novel. I'm glad I took a chance and revisited the characters.

Four stars

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