Twitter Tumblr FlickrFacebookContact me
Now 2018 Previous Articles Road Essays Road Reviews Author Title Source Age Genre Series Format Inclusivity LGBTA Portfolio

Recent posts


Month in review

Reviews
Avatar: The Last Airbender: North and South, Part Three by Gene Luen Yang
Books of a Feather by Kate Carlisle
Caleb and Kit by Beth Vrabel
CatStronauts: Robot Rescue by Drew Brockington
Country Matters by Michael Korda The Dashwood Sisters Tell All by Beth Pattillo Every Heart a Doorway by Seanan McGuire
Flaming Iguanas: An Illustrated All-Girl Road Novel Thing by Erika Lopez
The Football Girl by Thatcher Heldring
Froodle by Antoinette Portis
Goddess Boot Camp by Tera Lynn Childs
House Held Up by Trees by Ted Kooser and Jon Klassen
Inside Hudson Pickle by Yolanda Ridge
Insignificant Events in the Life of a Cactus by Dusti Bowling
To Kill a Kingdom by Alexandra Christo
The Kiss Quotient by Helen Hoang
Love Lies Bleeding by Susan Wittig Albert
Love, Penelope by Joanne Rocklin
Melena's Jubilee by Zetta Elliott and Aaron Boyd
Mystic River by Dennis Lehane
The Once Upon a Time Map Book by B.G. Hennessy and Peter Joyce
Poisoned Pages by Lorna Barrett
Questions Asked by Jostein Gaarder
The Sea Lady by Margaret Drabble
Sherlock Frankenstein and the Legion of Evil, Vol. 1 by Jeff Lemire
Spy on History: Victor Dowd and the World War II Ghost Army by Enigma Alberti
Sucks to Be Me by Kimberly Pauley
Thornhill by Pam Smy
Tim Ginger by Julian Hanshaw
Trail of Lightning by Rebecca Roanhorse
Winter Wonders by Kate Hannigan

Miscellaneous
Favorites of the first half of 2018
It's Monday! What Are You Reading? (July 02, 2018)
It's Monday! What Are You Reading? (July 09, 2018)
It's Monday! What Are You Reading? (July 16, 2018)
It's Monday! What Are You Reading? (July 23, 2018)
It's Monday! What Are You Reading? (July 30, 2018)
June 2018 Sources
June 2018 Summary

Road Essays
Are small towns uhoric or utopic?
An update on the road narrative reading
Road Narrative Spectrum
What isn't a road narrative: towards an ontological understanding of the road's importance

Previous month

Rating System

5 stars: Completely enjoyable or compelling
4 stars: Good but flawed
3 stars: Average
2 stars: OK
1 star: Did not finish


Privacy policy

This blog does not collect personal data. It doesn't set cookies. Email addresses are used to respond to comments or "contact us" messages and then deleted.


Love, Penelope: 07/17/18

Love, Penelope

Love, Penelope by Joanne Rocklin and illustrated by Lucy Knisley is set in Oakland in the year before same-sex marriages were given the green light by the Supreme court, and in the first year that the Golden State Warriors became a phenomenon. Though the novel is written by a Montrealer, this middle grade novel is the best East Bay depiction I've read.

In school Penelope has to do a heritage project but she's stumped because her father is dead and her mother is an orphan. The story she's been told is that both of her birth parents were orphans. The only one in her immediate family that has a heritage is Sammy, her mother's girlfriend.

Penelope outlines how she ends up fabricating her heritage by borrowing Sammy's in a series of letters she writes to her soon to be sibling as her mother is pregnant. This isn't a story of a much older half sibling being jealous of the baby-to-be. Penelope is thrilled to be a big sister.

Through Penelope's project we learn about Sammy's family. She's half Ohlone. Thankfully Penelope knows that she can't just claim to be Ohlone, even though that's what she first blurted out in school. Her project evolves into a way to honor her second Mom.

In the background of all of this are the Warriors. You live in the East Bay you can't avoid them. Penelope's enthusiasm for them rings true with so many children her age I know.

I could on for pages and pages about how authentic this book is. To that, though, I would end up spoiling the charming details. This book is delightful from start to finish.

Five stars

Comments (0)


Name:
Email (won't be posted):
Blog URL:
Comment: