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Month in review

Reviews
Al Capone Throws Me a Curve by Gennifer Choldenko
Beyond: the Queer Sci-Fi & Fantasy Comic Anthology edited by Sfé R. Monster
Birding Is My Favorite Video Game by Rosemary Mosco
Border Markers by Jenny Ferguson
Buried in Books by Kate Carlisle
The Cat of the Baskervilles by Vicki Delany
Chicks Dig Time Lords edited by Lynne M. Thomas
Click'd by Tamara Ireland Stone
Comics Will Break Your Heart by Faith Erin Hicks
Dim Sum of All Fears by Vivien Chien
Disney Manga: Magical Dance Volume 1 by Nao Kodaka
Drum Roll, Please by Lisa Jenn Bigelow
Ghostbusters: Crossing Over by Erik Burnham and Dan Schoening
Here and Now and Then by Mike Chen
Lost in the Labyrinth by Patrice Kindl
Old City Hall by Robert Rotenberg
The Neighbors Are Watching by Debra Ginsberg
On the Come Up by Angie Thomas
The Penderwicks on Gardam Street by Jeanne Birdsall
The Sign in the Smoke by Carolyn Keene
Song for a Whale by Lynne Kelly
Summerlost by Ally Condie
Swap'd by Tamara Ireland Stone
Sweet Legacy by Tera Lynn Childs
Tigers in Red Weather by Liza Klaussmann
Tiny Infinities by J.H. Diehl
To Night Owl from Dogfish by Holly Goldberg Sloan and Meg Wolitzer
Tops & Bottoms by Janet Stevens
The Weight of Our Sky by Hanna Alkaf
Which Big Giver Stole the Chopped Liver? by Sharon Kahn
Yellow Brick War by Danielle Paige

Miscellaneous
Curating while reading
February 2019 Sources
February 2019 Summary
It's Monday! What Are You Reading? (March 04)
It's Monday! What Are You Reading? (March 11)
It's Monday! What Are You Reading? (March 18)
It's Monday! What Are You Reading? (March 25)
The slippery slope of trying to read current
When February is three months long

Road Essays
FF00CC: orphans in the maze of the city

FF0099: an orphan in a city labyrinth: a close reading of Neil Gaiman's Neverwhere

FF0066: Orphans going offroad in the city

FF0033: An orphan's journey to the big city by way of the Blue Highway

Road Narrative Update for February 2019

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Rating System

5 stars: Completely enjoyable or compelling
4 stars: Good but flawed
3 stars: Average
2 stars: OK
1 star: Did not finish



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On the Come Up: 03/09/19

On the Come Up

On the Come Up by Angie Thomas draws from her experience as a teen rapper. Bri wants nothing more than to follow in her father's footsteps and be a rapper. Her mother would prefer she go to college like her brother. Her home life, though, is rocky and there's no guarantee that if she got into college she would be able to afford it.

In the Ring — the local rap battle event — Bri's main competitor is a boy whose stage name is Milez. She knows she has what it takes to beat him but it isn't until she's unfairly searched and tossed to the floor and then suspended for resisting at school that she truly finds her voice.

"On the Come Up" is the name of the rap Bri writes in an emotional response to being suspended. The entirety of the piece is included in the book and frankly, someone needs to perform it. Ideally, this book will also get optioned for a film and when produced, the titular rap would be included.

A question I've gotten from many interested readers is how does On the Come Up compare to The Hate U Give? Both are raw, emotional reads. Both feature believable, memorable leads. Both feature raw emotion but Starr and Bri are not the same person. They, though, are clearly products of the same environment but their outlets are different. Starr is an activist and her main platform is Tumblr — but later as the lead in the riot. Bri's outlet is rap. Both books are equally good, just different, as they should be.

Five stars

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